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Wintering shiitaki logs?  RSS feed

 
D Taylor
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Any idea if keeping shiitaki logs in a cool damp room (40F approx) would be better than leaving them outdoors in the cold wind and snow?
Maybe it's worth trying half and half- or is one known better than the other? Thanks.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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D Taylor wrote:Any idea if keeping shiitaki logs in a cool damp room (40F approx) would be better than leaving them outdoors in the cold wind and snow?
Maybe it's worth trying half and half- or is one known better than the other? Thanks.


Ours are outside year round...I think they like the extra rain and snow. We've had a flush as late as Christmas and as early as March but they are resting over the winter. What strain do you have? We are growing a wide range variety and have always wanted to add either a cold or warm weather strain to extend the season.
 
M.K. Dorje
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Location: Orgyen
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D, I'd need to know where you live and how cold/wet it gets before I could answer your question completely. Plus, how old are your logs?, have they fruited yet?, what kind of shape is the wood in?
But basically, if someone lived in zone 2 or 3 (very cold) or where the ground freezes solid for months at a time, I would suggest bringing the logs in, especially if they haven't fruited yet. But it's crucial that they don't dry out either, cause once they dry out too much, they might not fruit at all. But old logs in danger of losing their bark layer might benefit from protection from snow/ice/nonstop rain as well. I live in the Pacific Northwest (zone 8 ), and I'm leaving my oyster logs and chip boxes outside this year, with just a thin plastic cover over them sometimes. I started the logs inside late last winter and kept them inside a bunch of plastic bags in the closet while they were on their spawn run. They were covered with mycelium when I put them outside in June.
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