• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Should I use these trees?

 
Kevin Kilgore
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have some trees in pots in my backyard that I have been transplanting to a piece of rural property.
It appears that my planted backyard apple trees as well as my potted apple trees are suffering from some kind of blight or scab. Should I go ahead and transplant these potted apples to my rural place and contaminate the area or should I count them as a loss and start in my new place with presumably healthy, nursery fresh trees?

Thanks!
 
M.K. Dorje
Posts: 153
Location: Orgyen
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would suggest that you have an expert from the local university or extension service identify the disease, and then find out more about it. Normally though, it's best to start with healthy, disease-resistant trees from a local and reputable nursery. For example, I only plant peaches on my farm that are resistant to peach leaf curl disease.
 
richard valley
Posts: 240
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greetings, If these potted apple trees are in a damp, shaded spot maybe subjected to sprinkler, the leaves may look sick spotted, scabby and nibbled on by bugs, they most likely not be diseased. If planted in a more open sunny area they would do fine and not cause a problem there.

Set them in a sunny area and check the next new leaves for conditon.

I just reread your post and that have already planted some of these to the new location. If the new leaves have the same problem you have found. Check with a tree nursery and dust or spray to clean up the problem.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic