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Fukuoka's methods in North America  RSS feed

 
Sara Harding
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I have only been briefly introduced to his work, but I am interested in learning how Fukuoka's methods could be translated to North American landscapes. For instance, every kind of weed has a season in which it is growing and then dies back, and we can take advantage of the die back season to seed and mulch. What would be some other principles that would apply and are there some that would not apply at all? Could you share one or two examples that stand out to you? I'm also aware that North America contains a lot of different types of soil, climates, etc. so what would apply to the Pacific NW, may not apply to the SE piedmont areas.
 
larry korn
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Location: Ashland, Oregon
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Hi Sara, Yes, there sure are different climates and conditions out there so it is impossible to generalize. As far as weed control, Fukuoka began by not doing something...plowing. That starts the farmer or gardener on a plow-weed treadmill that is nearly impossible to manage. He used a straw mulch and a continuous ground cover of white clover. The clover was stron enough in his humid climate to keep grassy weeds from getting the upper hand. In general, Fukuoka got plants to do most of the work of controling weeds and building soil. More than a bundle of techniques, natural farming is about a state of mind and a world view. If I were to pick two central themes of NF it would be give up trying to control everything and have gratitude.
 
Terri Matthews
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Location: Eastern Kansas
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For me, seedballs failed. The few plants that came up looked like they were short on water.

Then again, I accidently spilled some grain on my lawn, the grain got rained in, and ithe grain came up looking well and healthy.

I really think that if the rain settles the wheat seeds into the ground that it will work. I would like to try this in a week or so, just before the next significant precipitation.

I live in Kansas, in the breadbasket of the nation. While the soil is rich the climate is rather harsh. Seed balls might work in a more humid climate, but I experienced problems with them.
 
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