• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Greg Martin

building up strength after flu

 
Posts: 38
Location: Pennines, northern England, zone 7b, avg annual rainfall 50"
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hi,

me and my partner have both been left weak and tired after a flu-like illness last week. we are both used to having high-energy lifestyles and are feeling frustrated by being so exhausted! as my partner in particular finds it hard to just stop working while he gets better, so i'm a bit concerned that this could turn into post-viral fatigue.

so, as well as simply resting and looking after ourselves, are there any herbs that support building up our strength? especially things indigenous to UK.

thanks
 
steward
Posts: 1748
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not indigenous to England , but my favorite recovery herb is Ginseng. Here also in the spring we use sassafras root and dandelion as a pick me up to help remove the sludges of winter.
 
steward
Posts: 3478
Location: woodland, washington
118
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
stinging nettles is my spring tonic of choice. in the adaptogen column, I like eleuthero (Siberian ginseng, Eleutherococcus senticosus) and tulsi (holy basil, Ocimum tenuiflorum). none of the three are indigenous to the UK, but they'll all grow there. tulsi and nettles should be easy. eleuthero might be a bit more difficult.
 
leanna jones
Posts: 38
Location: Pennines, northern England, zone 7b, avg annual rainfall 50"
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thanks

we have no shortage of nettles and dandelions, so i'll get on that! and i'll look into whether the others will grow in future.

i knew about ginseng but was a bit worried that it was a 'booster' rather than a strength-builder. by this i mean i thought it could give a false sense of energy and lead you to overextend and thus end up impeding your own recovery in the long term. but i'd be happy if i was wrong about this as i like ginseng.

this belief was based on taking ginseng during an extremely busy and stressful time, it kept me going and i felt fine but after the busy time was over i came off it and pretty much crashed - it was like a withdrawal!

but maybe used more gently it is a more gentle herb!

 
Posts: 73
Location: Central Valley California
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rosemary Gladstar has some very good recipes in her Medicinal Herbs beginner's guide. One is for adrenal toning using licorice root, rhodiola root, Siberian gingseng, cinnamon and making this into a tincture.
 
Posts: 19
Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Remember that with nettles - the shoots are best when young and tender. as they get older they get very fiberous and not great for ingestion. goes for tea and soup!

nettle soup is lovely spring warmer, tastes like strong spinach

Ollie
 
Posts: 228
Location: San Diego, CA USA
medical herbs writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Agree with Nettles and Dandelion! As for Ginseng, it can work for some people, but not others. The Siberian kind makes me feel like crap and the American kind doesn't even do anything. But I have the kind of constitution that is deficient and nervous, so relaxing herbs that are nourishing are much better.

Some people also have good luck with Echinacea, but me? Not so much. My favorite is Astragalus, and you can mix that with a little bit of Mullein too! Also, eating foods with raw garlic smashed in is good
 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found that Ginkgo Biloba and Sea Kelp helped pretty well. I've tried Ginseng before, but it didn't work as well as the previous two. At least that's what worked for me anyway.
 
The world's cheapest jedi mind trick: "Aw c'mon, why not read this tiny ad?"
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!