• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Blueberries, youth project and hugelkulture

 
Richard Brown
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Guys

It is with great delight that I join this community. Having been a member of a variety of forums (Morris Minors, Computers, etc) this one is the first where I feel that a more positive approach to this world is being taken. I am excited.

That said, I'll explain the project more. I am a youth worker based in Lostwithiel, Cornwall UK. We have a 3.5 acre semi woodland, arable land and we intend to use it as a school for young people. We want to train them in a variety of expertises but mostly to encourage teamwork, a love of the land, healthy food and a changing attitude to the world.

We need some advice in order to get going. We got a grant to purchase 300 blueberry bushes and grow cut flowers. However, we also want to start to grow an orchard, build some hugelkulture beds and start the road to a forest farm. But I'm not sure how to go about it. How do I integrate 300 blueberries into beds that will also allow us to develop a forest farm.

The problem is that we have only just started to clear the site. It is a large site but it has been unmanaged for 25 years and when we arrived it had a huge amount of self seeded willow, hazel, etc. We have cleared a size able area and want to plant the blueberries out but in such a way as to ensure we can underplant the blueberries. The other thing is can we plant some apple trees or a canopy over the blueberries.

Any advice would be brilliant. Thanks.

Rich
http://wild-woods.org.uk/
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3658
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
134
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy Richard welcome to Permies! Looks like a great project you are involved with. I am no expert but my first thought would be to just heal the plants in until you are ready to plant them. Do you have to get the blueberries right away? Is your soil acidic?
 
Richard Brown
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Miles Flansburg wrote:Howdy Richard welcome to Permies! Looks like a great project you are involved with. I am no expert but my first thought would be to just heal the plants in until you are ready to plant them. Do you have to get the blueberries right away? Is your soil acidic?


Thanks Miles. Excellent reply. We had already decided to do this but wasn't sure if this was the best thing to do. Thanks for the confirmation.

Just looking to develop the rest of the site now.

Rich
 
Richard Brown
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Miles Flansburg wrote:Is your soil acidic?


I should have said no but we have bought 28 bags of erricaceous soil.

Rich
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3658
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
134
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OK Richard you got me stumped on that big word. . What is that?
 
Richard Brown
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Miles Flansburg wrote:OK Richard you got me stumped on that big word. . What is that?


I spelt it wrong! Ericaceous soil is acidic soil or soil with a ph value of 7 or less.

We could stick in Mulberry but it would grow to big unless heavily managed. Potatoes would thrive but I'm not sure if disturbing Blueberry roots is a good idea. I'm thinking of tomatoes.... possibly heather. I am told I could try sorrel, clover, chard cranberry, lupine and wild strawberries but would love to get some further advice?

Thanks for asking

Rich
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic