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prickly pear  RSS feed

 
charles c. johnson
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I Plastered a farm house last spring . The owner was going to kill all of th prickly pear. So i took it home. I love it. Just want to know if anyone else grows it, or would like so. You can eat the pads and pears. I tried making wine from the pear this year. It tasted good , but was very thick like syrup so no one will drink it. cept me lol
 
gary gregory
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Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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My friends barbecue it,  we like it in scrambled eggs.
 
charles c. johnson
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the pads?
or the pear
 
gary gregory
Posts: 395
Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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charles johnson "carbonout" wrote:
the pads?
or the pear

The pads.  We get the pickled nopales at safeway, but are now growing some.
 
jeremiah bailey
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How easy is this to grow indoors for the winter? I like cacti and my mom used to grow some, but I don't think she had any prickly pear when she still lived here in Indiana. I would love to add a cactus to my garden.
 
charles c. johnson
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I live in illinois and it winters fine leave it outside all year  speads like wild fire.its hearty like hen and chicks
 
                              
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Location: Inland Central Florida, USA
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We even have prickly pear growing around here in FL.  It's find so long as it is in a well drained location.

What is the easiest way to propagate it?  I think I might want to move a little of it before it gets smashed where it currently is (not a very big one growing in a location where it could get run over if people are not careful.)
 
jeremiah bailey
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Hens and chicks are something that I know about growing. Set and forget. We had some growing on a cypress stump covered in gravel. I love prickly pear fruits. Would you be willing to trade some plants? I currently only have seeds, and a limited selection:
From packets from past seed season from Jung Seed Co:
Tomato - Heirloom paste - Opalka 
Melon - Heirloom cantelope - Amish
Saved seed:
Pea - Snow Pea - Sandy
Tomato - Heirloom cherry - Koralik
Tomato - OP drying - Principe Borghese
Cowpea - Heirloom - Pink Eyed Purple Hull

I could also send post paid packaging, or other arrangement.
 
rose macaskie
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      A freind of mines boy frind grew her one on her balcony because she wanted to have something she could forget about, never water . I think he just stuck half a leaf in a flower pot . I have a decorative one a purply edged one on a balcony, i have not tried to grow others, i am afraid of touching it it prickles so.
  What are the pads how do you eat them. rose
 
jeremiah bailey
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Rose: The pads are the "leaves" or green vegetative water storing parts of the cactus. Basically you peel them and cook them. Do a google search for "cooking prickly pear pads". You'll get some recipes and ideas from there.
TCLynx: From what I've been researching, you just cut off a pad and stick it in soil. Don't water, as it stores enough to root itself. Watering apparently can lead to rotting, instead of rooting.
 
                              
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Location: Inland Central Florida, USA
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I believe you can burn the spines off but prickly pear are some of the least prickly cactus out there.
 
Leah Sattler
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we have bunches of prickly pear growing all over our property. I havne't yet started experimenting so i am going to be watching this thread! I wonder why the wine turned out thick? does it taste OK?
 
gary gregory
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Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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Leah Sattler wrote:
we have bunches of prickly pear growing all over our property. I havne't yet started experimenting so i am going to be watching this thread! I wonder why the wine turned out thick? does it taste OK?


Do your goats eat them Leah?
 
jeremiah bailey
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Leah, from looking at a few recipes and their descriptions, some are more like a normal fruit wine, but most seem to be thicker, almost like a mead.
 
charles c. johnson
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i will send you a couple slips  just send me private msg
just make sure you can plant it in your state i don't want you to get in trouble


Prickly pear species were introduced into Australia in the late 1800s, causing major ecological damage in the eastern states (see www.northwestweeds.nsw.gov.au).
 
220 hours of permaculture video, freaky cheap! http://kck.st/2q6Ycay.
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