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Transplanting Locust seedlings

 
Dumas Walker
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Not quite a year ago, I started some black and honey locust seeds. I planted them indoors and kept them well lit through the Winter. This Spring, after the threat of frost had cleared, I moved them outdoors. The best looking ones were transplanted into 5-gallon buckets, while some of the scraggly ones were left in smaller containers.

The ones in the buckets all perished, either from apparent natural causes or from critter activity. However, all was not lost as some of the scraggly Honey Locusts came on. I now have them in the 5-gallon buckets, and have surrounded the opening of the buckets with cylinders made of wire that are high enough to keep the "diggers" out. They are growing well, but I have doubts that they will reach the prescribed 3-6 foot range that is considered ideal for transplanting by the end of this Autumn.

I half-way wonder if the issues the seedlings had this Spring were that they didn't really go through an "Autumn" season like they should have. They got a simulated Spring in my basement, and then were introduced to the wild in actual Spring. Even though the surviving seedlings may not be up to size for transplanting late this Autumn, should I go ahead and leave them outdoors over the Winter so that they can at least get used to the changing of seasons?

Also, if they get to be 3-6 feet tall by Spring, should I transplant them then, or wait until next Autumn?

BTW, the 5-gallon buckets do have drain holes drilled into them, in case anyone wonders. on edit: Also, I am in Central KY, if that makes a difference regarding the changing of seasons question.

Thanks!!!
 
andrew curr
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
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They like it better being shifted when dormant!
^6 inches is ok height!
 
Dumas Walker
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Thanks for the reply. I do not plan to shift them until after they are dormant. Around here, that'd be in late November or early December, before the ground gets too hard (if it gets hard). They will certainly be over 6 inches by the time the drop their leaves. One of them is at least 18 inches at this point.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Dumas,

How did the honey locust transplanting go? Did you get them outside for the 13-14 winter? How did they look in the spring, and by fall of 14?

I've been on the cold tolerant pomegranate thread, and we're starting to talk about transitioning plants from sun rooms and green houses to outdoors, bringing larger shrubs and trees-- up to 5 gallon size -- from other climates.

I've had varied success with that.

I got to thinking maybe it should have its own thread, because it's about the transitioning of plants, not a specific plant.

Is there a thread that you know of on transitioning plants?

Thanks
Thekla
 
andrew curr
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
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This year i transplanted some scion wood (Roof sucker )off an established high yielding female Gleditsia!!thornless

some died back but shot away! the best are 2ft and pumping the worst 6inches!
My state has just made them illegal!!! Although the law is a complex thing (because i have doccumented evidence of sugar gliders using G as a food source) I dont think i could possibly remove them!


Google sugar glider!




Peace love and happieness
 
Dumas Walker
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Thelka,
I was not able to get any of them out for Winter 13-14. I actually thought they'd all died. However, one of them came back the next spring! Shot up a new main "trunk" right next to the dead one. It did well over the Summer, so I transplanted it just after Thanksgiving. We will see how it comes back in the Spring.

Last year, I dug up and transplanted a red bud at a similar time of year. It came back well. The Tulip Poplar I transplanted in Spring made it through the Summer well. We will see if it comes back. These two were both "volunteers" that sprung up in areas that were not good places for them to stay (but apparently were good places to get started! ).
 
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