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butter making  RSS feed

 
Posts: 212
Location: Sacramento, CA
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when i was a kid my mom made butter she went to the farm near us got a lot of milk and made our butter and yogurt that way. When i watch the DIY on how to make butter i notice it is different then how I remember it. Yogurt as well

I don't remember her boiling it. I also remember her putting old butter into the new butter to make more butter. Same for the yogurt. Is that incorrect?
 
Posts: 47
Location: The Netherlands
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Boiling it is something you do to make it last longer and to minimize the risk of for example Listeria bacteria. The latter should you imho only do if you plan to serve it to children, elderly or other people who aren't too fit to start with because with boiling you also destroy a lot of the benefits of raw milk.

Making yoghurt is easy. Start with lukewarm milk, stir in a spoon of your previous batch and wait until finished.

Making butter requires a lot more work. First let the milk stand for some time until you can see the separation, the cream now floats on the top. Spoon it off, put it in a churn and start churning until you get little clumps of butter and buttermilk. Yes this takes a lot of time, if you're lazy like me you can also let your mixer do the work for you. After that you put it trough a filter or fine strain and you got butter and buttermilk. Add a pinch of salt to the butter for preservation and taste and you're done.
There probably will be still a few minuscule drops of butter in your buttermilk that escaped the strain but that's ok, it's really tasty to press them out against your palate with your tongue when you drink the buttermilk.
 
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I've never made yogurt, but was raised churning butter. No, you do not add old butter to the fresh cream. Cream contains two ingredients - butter and buttermilk. We always put the cream into a gallon jar and rocked the jar. The cream should be about 65 degrees F. to make the job go quicker. As the jar is rocked, the butter particles bump together and stick. When the butter has formed into a clump, the job of churning is done. The buttermilk is then stained off and the butter is placed into a bowl. We always "washed" our butter. Run cold water into the bowl and work the butter, drain, and work again. when the water drains off clear, work all the remaining water out of the butter. We then added salt and packaged. This thread is the first I have ever heard of boiling the cream. I would think that if the cow is healthy, the milk handled properly and everything used is clean, there would be no need to boil. To me, that would be just like "store bought" lol.
 
Posts: 626
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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Good thread here on making butter:
http://www.permies.com/t/26523/fermentation/Cultured-butter#208861
 
Posts: 12
Location: Southeast Michigan
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I've made both butter and yogurt for years.

Butter: I pour some heavy cream into a pint jar and shake it back and forth while watching tv until it separates. I filter out the buttermilk and save it for rolls or bread or whatever. Then i rinse the butter until the water runs pretty clear, add a bit of salt and done.

Yogurt: I heat natural milk (whole + cream still in there) to 180, let it cool to 116. Then i add either yogurt i already have or a package of cultures if i ran out. I let it sit for 7 or so hours in a yogurt maker (insulated cooler that is designed to keep the mixture at 116-ish for that 7 hour period). Then i strain mine after through muslin to get the thicker greek-like stuff. I've never liked runny yogurt.
 
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Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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Just a quick sales pitch for the wonders of clarified butter, also know as Ghee. We put up as much ghee as we possibly can all season long. It stores all winter long in the cellar, and is the best cooking oil in the world.

Making ghee is just a matter of gently heating the butter to evaporate off all remaining buttermilk. It is the buttermilk, in tiny amounts, that goes rancid and requires the butter to be refrigerated. Ghee is a preserved product that is as old as history in India, motherland of the dairy cow.
 
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