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Plant ID, North Texas, Texoma region

 
Jason Hudgins
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This grows all over my yard. A few clues, soil here is mostly clay, and it's very alkaline. It's fragrant as well, and I think it's some kind of salvia, but I haven't had much luck identifying it on my own. Any ideas?


 
joey tran
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are you looking to get rid of it? im curious wut the fragrant smells like. i bet others on the forums can id it. =)
 
Jason Hudgins
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joey tran wrote:are you looking to get rid of it? im curious wut the fragrant smells like. i bet others on the forums can id it. =)


No, definitely not looking to eradicate it!

I just bought this place less than a year ago and I'm still trying to learn about all the plants and trees that are prevalent here. I don't know how to describe the smell, but when these plants dry and get hit with a mower it's very distinctive, and it's not a bad either, imo. I definitely would not call it a fruity sweet fragrance, more on the spicy side if that makes any sense. =)
 
wayne stephen
steward
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Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
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Can you post a close up of the leaf and maybe a flower ?
 
Bob Dobbs
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First guess is a poliomintha longiflora. True mexican oregano. This is truly a guess. Great stuff if that is it, I may ask you to send me cuttings..... They do have a salvia-like flower.
And, they have the benefit of being the highest ORAC per gram of anything.

If you can get a better/closer picture I can ID it with certainty.
 
chris cromeens
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Location: north texas 7b now 8a
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That my friend is Texas Croton, native to our upland areas. Nothing eats it(rabbits eat it in the worst of times), grows on disturbed soils. There is also a variety around that gets 3ft or so.
What part of Texoma are you in? We are just west of Hagerman Wildlife Refuge.
 
chris cromeens
Posts: 62
Location: north texas 7b now 8a
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texas croton
just in case I am wrong, but pretty sure it is a croton, I have it in places I overgraze, it let's me know of my mistake
 
Jason Hudgins
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wayne stephen wrote:Can you post a close up of the leaf and maybe a flower ?


Pulled a sprig and took this picture over the weekend.

 
Jason Hudgins
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chris cromeens wrote:That my friend is Texas Croton, native to our upland areas. Nothing eats it(rabbits eat it in the worst of times), grows on disturbed soils. There is also a variety around that gets 3ft or so.
What part of Texoma are you in? We are just west of Hagerman Wildlife Refuge.


I think you're right, I do have poorly covered, calcareous soil. Going to take a lot of work to rehab this place I guess. Good thing I enjoy a challenge.

I live near Whitewright, TX. Technically I'm probably a mile or two south of where 'Texoma' officially starts.
 
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