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Help Tackling Rose Rosette disease?  RSS feed

 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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Organic herbs are our livelihood and the bulk of the herb that I use is multiflora rose hips. We have more than you can count along the base of the hill and on the other side of the bottom land in wide swaths with gigantic bushes. . We keep the pathways trimmed and keep them trimmed into their area. In areas like pathways where we mow regularly, the roses that were there were killed.

These multiflora rose hips are tremendously valuable to us since they have one of the highest concentrations of Vitamin C, but now most of the rose bushes down there have rose rosette disease. I've read that you have to dig them up and burn the whole plant, but I refuse to believe that at this point. I know people have successfully tackled this disease naturally and the first part is cutting all them way back and to sterilize the snips as you go. The rest I'll learn later in trying to recreate some commercially available all natural sprays and teas or just figure out to use what I have on hand.

I spent a few hours and only tackled half a bush, but I'm determined to make a go of this. Sooo!! Has anyone cured their rose bushes of this?

Also, I have 26% peroxide. Can I dilute that to sterilize my snips? Or is there a better way?

If you feel the need to chime in here that I"m an idiot to allow the multiflora and that I need to get rid of them all, just restrain yourself.
 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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Might try this:
http://www.dirtdoctor.com/Rose-Rosette-Newsletter_vq4743.htm

Some reading and watching I'm going to do (couldn't get the video to load yesterday)
http://www.floridachemical.com/ - someone recommended, I need to make sure it's organic and not harmful to my good bugs.
http://anla.org/knowledgecenter/ticker/index.cfm?view=detail&colid=123&cid=378&mid=5698
http://anla.theknowledgecenter.com/OnDemand/index.cfm?view=category&colid=143&cid=377

 
Akiva Silver
Posts: 161
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Rose rosette disease is a virus transmitted by mites that travel on the wind. When a rose bush has the disease it is systemic. It can not be pruned out as far as I understand, because the disease is inside the whole plant by the time symptoms appear. I'm not really sure what you could do, I have heard of people destroying diseased plants, but if it's in the area it seems like they will all eventually get it. So far no resistant roses have been discovered, but I believe it's only a matter of time.
One thing I have noticed on the roses that have died on our property is that after I remove them, I have this wonderful patch of rich bare soil, perfect for planting in.
I wish you the best of luck as things seem to be changing fast. Multiflora only became invasive in the 40's and it is already being threatened, it's really amazing watching the swings.
 
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