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UV water treatment...  RSS feed

 
M Foti
Posts: 171
Location: western n.c.
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I've been having a hard time finding information on this from folks who aren't trying to sell me something. Anyone out there know of some real tests done on water before and after the UV "filter"? We are building our licensed cannery this winter and the state department of agriculture said we "can" use spring water, but they would prefer a well. Getting a well drilled is not cheap, so I was curious about other methods to appease them. I'm thinking mechanical filtration before UV sterilization? Any other advice for affordable systems that a government agency would not frown upon (meaning no bio-filtration or other earthy techniques)?

Our spring water has never made us sick and is a fantastic spring, even pumping out generous amounts of water during the worst droughts. Even if I had to drill a well, I would still use this water for my home, but since they do allow spring water to be used (albeit with some hesitation I detected in their tone of voice), I think if I had a really nice filtration system in place that it would appease the inspectors...
 
Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I can't answer your questions but I can relate some info that may help.

Usually water goes through a micro filter before going through the UV lamp. The filter systems are simple and usually use a string wound filter cartridge. The main thing with the UV system from my undertanding is the flow rate of the water. Too fast and it fails to properly sterilize that water, so the size of the UV system has to match the water pump. Be aware that he UV lamp will be running 24/7 because non-flowing water can readily build up bacteria.

Does the State require your spring to be capped? Something to look into if it isn't already done. Capping the spring keeps out vermin and reduces the chance of E. coli contamination.

I'd ask the State people exactly what style of filtration system would result in your approval. In my experience officials tap dance a lot prior to inspection, but during inspection (of course after you've spent a lot of money) they are very strict, stern, all-knowing, dictorial, and suddenly know exactly what you should have....and it isn't what you installed. I'd also have all my dealings in writing because I have experienced times were officials and inspectors suddenly have amnesia. Being able to pull out a letter to show the inspector can mean the difference between being approved or rejected.

Best of luck with your project. I hope it's successful!
 
M Foti
Posts: 171
Location: western n.c.
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thanks, I appreciate the advice! If I could afford it, I'd just drill a well and be done with it, but I'm already dropping 5 thousand into the septic for the cannery, plus the building itself and outfitting it. Saving the 5 grand or so for a well would help alot...
 
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