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New to site, need advice

 
Lee Buck
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Just found this forum and I can tell I will be doing a lot of reading here. I have about 10 acres and I have started dropping trees and clearing. The property is made up of Pines and I have a few good stacks of logs around the property. Do I just sacrifice a couple logs and then make an A frame stack on them? How long do I have till they need to be milled? Any and all advice will be appreciated.
Thanks
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hi Lee,

Welcome to Permies!!!

First, when you have a chance, go to the top of the page and click on my profile and fill that out completely if you don't mind. We like knowing where folks are from, and a bit about them, as it helps with giving advice for general permaculture issues.

I will reason that you have a plan for your logs all thought out, as cutting trees down without having a good plan for the timber is a fast way to end up with log that aren't good from much but mulch, and/or hugelkultur.

I am not sure what you mean by an "a frame," as that is a for architecture, not a stacking method for logs? Do you have something in mind that I am not understanding?

You are good for cutting in winter, mainly because the bugs aren't as active in most areas, but you do need to get them off the ground into "bunks" or "cribs," at your "log landing" site that should be in a good location for relocating the wood onto trucks or for hewing/milling. What is often down for logs that will be milled or hewn is to cut a lesser quality log into 1 m (3') sections, notch just a little in the center and place these in a row about 2.4 m (8') apart. Then set a heaver log across these. You are going to make at least 3 of these and then place your other logs across them to get them off the ground.

Terms you should know, a tree dropped is a "log", a log cut into sections for milling is called a "bolt" (add about 150 mm (6") to 300 mm (12") for desire length of timber or board) and if you rough these out with ax or milling to have one or more flat sides they are called a "cant."

You need to get a proper lumber list together asap, and have the wood milled and "properly" stacked. If the logs go into warm weather the mold and bugs will get into them quick, which isn't that great and lowers the value/quality of the wood.

Regards,

j
 
Lee Buck
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I am just looking for suggestions as to stacking and storage of the logs. It will be a few months before I can do any milling.
 
Tim Wells
Posts: 119
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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If you know the final use, fuel eg: then cut to useful woodburner size, make a shantytown roundwood woodstore with thatched brush walls/ roof/ tarp roof and fill it up.

Or if unsure of final use then best to leave as long a possible and stack on 2 or more logs at the right angle underneath to raise it up.

I like to have an idea of final use of all wood as i process, make less work in long term. you dont want to be double handling the wood ideally.

brush is faggots, kindling, animal feed or thatch for natural stock fencing/ shelters
then 4 ft straight stuff is pegs for hedges and patching stack fencing
longer straight stuff are fenceposts and thicker stuff gateposts and long thick stuff roundwood timber framing. So sort it as you go imo
 
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