• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Modularity in Design and ROI for Farmers  RSS feed

 
Posts: 75
Location: Sandy Mush, NC
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Grant, I was just thinking a bit about design approaches and the importance of modularity-- a crucial concept for farm resiliency, as well as quality permaculture design.

First, my take on it-- Modular systems often lead to intuitive stacking of functions and the versatility that allows for low-impact farm management (rotational grazing systems being a prime example). One shortcoming to modular design is the initial high investment cost. For example, using 16' hog panels for a permanent perimeter fence increases the fencing cost by 2-300% that of field fencing. But the advantages far out-weigh the cost in many situations. Panel fencing allows for a fluid relationship to the land, since any panel can become a gate at any time and the fence can be more easily rerouted or removed (e.g., replaced after time by a mature hedgerow fenceline). It also creates a more resilient design, since any damage to one panel (fallen tree, etc) can easily be repaired without damaging the whole fence. Another great example would be the gravity feeding of stacked pond terraces and swales on a hillside for water storage. The initial outlay is far more expensive than a standard drainage ditch, but the benefits are huge.

I am interested in the theme and what other good modular approaches are out there, as well as learning useful strategies for grant proposals that can account for the future ROI of unorthodox management strategies that often have relatively little precedent in my area and that require a larger investment than what the USDA/FSA/NRCS are used to.

Thanks!
 
Posts: 219
Location: Iowa City, Iowa Zone 5
20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
GREAT QUESTION!

We could talk for days, so let's tackle a module! [FENCING]

...Keep in mind I would normally charge $225/hr 4hr minimum for this sort of consulting! (I'm about to earn you $20,000+)

1) get on the FREE MONEY FOR FARMERS list, I'll share more resources as time allows:

Let's get started!

We'll start with EQIP as a source of grants to accomplish your goals.

Scenario: 2014 North Carolina, 40 acre farm
Assumption: You qualify as an HU beginning farmer (Historically Underserved - have filed less than 10 years of Schedule F - farm taxes)

Perimeter Fence
option 1: Practice 382 Electric exclusion fence. 5,280 lineal feet (one mile) PAYS $1.98/ft ($2.33 if mountain site) total grant funds: $10,454 ($12,302 if mountainous)

option 2: Practice 382 Confinement fence (panelized or taller for deer). 5,280 lineal feet (one mile) PAYS $4.75/ft total grant funds: $25,080

I would then use one of several options to plant a multifunctional windbreak/hedgrow/living fence directly inside of your new perimeter fence (also using a grant program). As the fence inevitably decays, your new modular hedge apple/black locust/conifer fence is growing up. You may ley a hedge/pollard for new posts/ or (my pick - lash electric to living trunks). Needless to say, another $5k for planting trees is available for this theoretical site. - I've got to keep up with all the questions though!

It's important to approach NRCS folks with respect and a clear plan for conservation. I'd also encourage hiring a pollinator Conservation Activity Plan

Join the list
 
Daniel Bowman
Posts: 75
Location: Sandy Mush, NC
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Grant, great to be talking to you, I am definitely signed up on the list and have been talking to my NRCS guy about EQIP and other incentives. Thanks for being such a great resource!
 
Posts: 180
Location: Missouri/Iowa border
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow! Please elaborate a little more. I'd love to see you cover another module to get this clear in my head.
 
Grant Schultz
Posts: 219
Location: Iowa City, Iowa Zone 5
20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nicholas Covey wrote:Wow! Please elaborate a little more. I'd love to see you cover another module to get this clear in my head.



You'll have to get on the list.
 
Nicholas Covey
Posts: 180
Location: Missouri/Iowa border
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm on it. Consequently I am not terribly far from your location, so I might be interested in taking one of your workshops in the future.
 
Grant Schultz
Posts: 219
Location: Iowa City, Iowa Zone 5
20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nicholas Covey wrote:I'm on it. Consequently I am not terribly far from your location, so I might be interested in taking one of your workshops in the future.



Look forward to meeting you soon Nicholas, there will be a lot of like minds at the Advanced Farm & Homestead Design Workshop!
 
permaculture is giving a gift to your future self. After reading this tiny ad:
Rocket Oven plan download
https://permies.com/t/rocket-oven-plans
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!