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wall plaster with flour?  RSS feed

 
Afghani Nurmat
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Location: southern germany
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Hi there again,

today i saw this video, where the guy really seems to know what he is doing with his plaster:



but if i understood him right he mixes flour in his mortar. wouldn`t that practically be an invitation for mold?
anyone with experience?

thanks and take care,
afghani
 
bob day
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Location: Central Virginia USA
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i'm not an expert by any means, but cellulose--as in wood etc is really just a much longer chain of the same molecules that make up starch which is a longer chain of the molecules that make up sugar.

The stronger invitation to mold is dampness and warmth, so keep a wall dry and it is probably only marginally more susceptible to mold, and perhaps the glutinous sticky qualities offset that marginal weakness (if it is a weakness at all)

just a thought
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hello Afghani,

Yes mold very much can be an issue. I would also note that I have difficulty with many folk coming to this "natural and traditional" building world, with there I have been doing this for "x" many times (usually less than 5 to 10 years) and making videos, teaching workshops and generally leading folks down some pretty "scary rabbit holes." Don't get me wrong, I support both traditional and natural building, as I have been doing it for over 35 years, and yes much of it is "easy," (subjectively I think it is all really easy.) Yet, as a teacher and facilitator of these different modalities of "good building practice," I know that many (most?) are not to the uninitiated, and can have some serious drawbacks if you just watch a few videos, or take a few workshops. I love the enthusiasm of the young, yet see way more "questionable" practices than I would like to see.

So yes, you can use flour, and many other additive to "cream out," your plasters and renders, but you really need to know what you are doing and have learned from someone that has a lot of experience with these traditions. I would actually rather see someone read 20 books on these varied subjects (twice then tackle a project than take a one or two workshops, and watch a few videos thinking that is better. Books and an experienced Mentor is way more valuable time wise (though workshops are fun and great...just don't think they are enough.) Also, experiment, test and see what happens... It's kind'a like the old adage, "measure 100 times...cut once."

Regards,

j
 
Afghani Nurmat
Posts: 24
Location: southern germany
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@ bob day
basically true of course (and i agree that dampness is probably a much bigger issue than a little starch in your wall), but starch is really much easyier available for any organism. ever eaten any straw
the bonds between the glucose molecules are different in starch and cellulose; starch chains are branched (the bonds at the forks are even weaker) - cellulose not; cellulose molecules are huge (up to 1/4 inch);and (major difference for all digesters) starch is potentially water soluble - cellulose not


@jay

I totally agree with you that a long unbroken tradition is very desirable in building techniques (which in modern techniques is not even possible to have, because of the fast change). buildings should last for the longest time possible without having to be rebuilt and you can only know how good a new technique really is if you have seen the results after many many years.
but the problem is that this tradition has already been broken. at least where i live only very little people know about these old techniques and so i have no other choice than watch videos and read books. there are not even seminars here. thats what i love the internet and this platform for. you can get advice from experienced folks, which is priceless. thanks everyone!

take care,
afghani


 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hi Afghani,

You raised great points, and I too often have heated debates with my peers in the "modern" building careers about what constitutes "good building practices." Making money, speed, and how easy something is, does not make it a "good idea." I would add that just because something is modern does not make it superior to something that is ancient in design and application. Since most buildings today will not last even 100 years, I find much of modernity, useless.

I would challenge you on making a stronger effort to find those that do practice these old ways, and not just videos. The internet is a great place to meet folks, exchange ideas, learn, and expand your knowledge of skill sets you want and need. Yet, spend more time finding the real person, doing the real work, and less time on videos that may (or may not) have good information in them. I know that living in a "first world" nation it can be more of a challenge than where people still have to live and build more naturally, but it is feasible. Germany has many "traditional arts and crafts" people and organizations all over the country. I would be glad to help you vet them to determine which is of worth and help you find mentors in the traditions you are interested in. I have a student of mine that comes there on a regular basis each year, that speaks both German, English, and a few other languages. He is well versed in timber framing and other traditional skill sets.

Regards,

j
 
Afghani Nurmat
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Location: southern germany
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Hi Jay,
I would be totally interested! Especially if you know people or now how to get to them who have experience with cob and the like. Beeing a trained blacksmith I do know a little about restoring old buildings, but what i am really interested in is beeing able to build a "biodegradable" house myself. One that will be a beautiful, comfortable, energy-efficient and sound home for my family and future generations.

Take care,
Afghani
 
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