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Enclosed hugel

 
Harmony Hunden
Posts: 18
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Im planning on making three or four raised beds because gopher holes are the only landscaping in this sun irradiated wasteland. I have scavenged a bunch of boards about eight niches high and eight feet long, a bunch of landscaping brick like things some are like large rocks and some are like flat cinder locks sort of. Probably more expensive then rabbit wire in the LNG run but free to scavenge. Anyways I am thinking of making beds three feet deep with the stones and bricks merely touching for a floor to keep varmints out. Is this plausible? There are plenty of dead trees to pile on the bottom foot then a foot of manure, straw wood hips and poop, and then a foot of soil from. Previous possible garden that is now a dried up maze for the gophers. Idly I will find. Wy to make these beds four feet wide and sixteen long.
My min questions are will the stone and brick floor block gophers yet low for enough drainage, and do I relly need to care bout drainage when it's sooooo hot and dry? I have found some chicken wire too would it be useful to use it under the stones or better t use it over the bed as nfence like shelter? Also any tips on making raied beds be like n anti hot house? Like is there a way to make hoops on the wood instead of the ground and is there a cheap easy way to cover it to keep sun reflected and temps down during the hottest hours of the day? I'm used to just starting seeds to transplant next month right now instead of dealing with it being the end of the wet, how cal they call this wet, season this early and I just moved to the high desert.
Thanks...
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1134
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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Every thing I have read indicates that a raised hugle in an arid environment is a mistake.
If you add a water retaining liner, this will be more of a wicking bed, and should work better.
Just theory on my part.
Some shade cloth on a hoophouse type frame could help slow evaporation and resist the harsh beams of the sun.

Check YouTube for Rob Bob's videos, he lives in Australia and deals with extreme heat.
 
Harmony Hunden
Posts: 18
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Thanks for the feedback. So would a relatively closely spaced brick, concrete chunk and large stone bottom still give too much drainage? I am trying to make a few beds to get started with scraps I can scavenge and other than regular tarps there is not much I can think of that would work as a water retaining liner.
Googling rob bob.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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