William Bronson

gardener
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since Nov 27, 2012
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forest garden trees urban
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William Bronson currently moderates these forums:
Montessori kid born and raised in Cincinnati.
Father of two, 14 years apart in age,married to an Appalachian Queen 7 years my junior,trained by an Australian cattle dog/pit rescue.
I am Unitarian who declines official membership, a pro lifer who believes in choice, a socialist, an LGBTQ ally, a Black man, and perhaps most of all an old school paper and pencil gamer.
I make, grow, and serve, not because I am gifted in these areas, rather it is because doing these things is a gift to myself.
Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Recent posts by William Bronson

Where I live raccoons and possums  are nocturnal unless something is wrong with them.
Rats, mice and voles are of no danger to any of my mature chickens as long as they are awake.
Based on that,  my chicken yard is fenced against dogs and  coyotes, with 4" or even larger openings.
The hens are in the coop by dusk,  and the coop has no openings bigger than 1/2".
When I had a combination coop/run, only the bottom 2 feet of fencing had 1/2" sized openings,  just to sure that raccoons couldn't spook them into reach.
The rest was chain link and such, but I wasn't worried about rat sized predators at that time.

I don't have a lot of hawk pressure but If I did I would try wires,  chicken wire or snowfencing overhead.
I do have a lot of natural cover for the hens, mostly for shade/food.

1 hour ago
Slipform walls is what I think of.


Here is an image showing the use of rubble in slipform construction.



I have done this informally to save on the use of concrete,  but only as a single course.


2 days ago
I love that channel, and that method.
I am making char in trenches at the house, but digging at at our grow yard is very difficult.

I aim to turn a water heater into a similar retort.
It will be longer and narrower,allowing for linger peices.
It's also plumbed for easy quenching.
2 days ago


Around here they sell a corn liquor call Everclear.
It's mostly good for trying to killing the people who drink it,  but it's also an effective killer of pathogens at 92.4% ethanol by weight.
Maybe this high proof liquor could be a no heat, food safe solution?
4 days ago
I'm confused about the rain water thing.
Unless you are growing inside a building those vegetables will be watered with rain directly  from the sky.
Is it contamination during storage or collection process  that's the concern?
Are you expected to use food safe grade hoses as well?


I keep a bunch of old pieces of hose and barbed fittings for tying my container gardens together.
Very cheap and easy to use.
So instead of a "real" drip system or a soaker hose  maybe try regular hose with holes poked into it.
No need to clean clogged holes,  just poke a new one.
"New" hoses are available for free every year,  from the garbage.
Interesting subject!
I "freshen" the soil in my sub-irrigated planters with urine every year,  along with top dressing  them with  rabbit bedding.
I just planted a new blue berry bush in a wicking barrel.
The "soil" is 100% peat.
The first one I planted this way was slow to grow until I followed a Permies suggestion and fertilized with urine.
This time I've  added a full gallon of pee to the container, just weeks after planting.
I also dump the spent grounds from my cold brew on the surface.

We just planted a bunch of corn into well rotted woodchips.
If the wife is cool with it,  I'll add pee when it starts growing kernels.
I should put a sawdust or biochar urinal in place at our grow yard just for this eventuality.
4 days ago
Conventional instructions for planting artichokes emphasize the need for compost and fertilizer.
The days to maturity are 100-150 and most do not flower until the second year of growth.
I'm not clear in what climate you are in,  or what variety of artichokes you have,  but I think your plants need lots of  time and lots of nitrogen rich compost.
Any ideas?


1 week ago
What if you moved them more often than every 3 days?
Would the grass recover more quickly,  thus allowing you to use fewer, larger paddocks?
1 week ago
No experience here,  but I am interested.
Like you said there is at least one study out there on this.
I went looking for it when I realized that oyster mushrooms eat the one thing that keeps wood from being digested  by cows.

I hope you get some answers or at least some more replies.
1 week ago