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! soil crete for outside  RSS feed

 
Angelika Maier
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I want something like a concrete slab around the house and on the terrace. Around the house it shuold keep the grass and the weeds away because of termites. The terrace without a roof for seating (what a luxurous idea to sit in the garden!!!). Is soil crete suitable? Are there good DIY instructions? Can I pretty it up with colour or mosaic etc? What about the base for the soil crete?  How do I get a bit of a slope that the water runs off?
Or do you have any other ideas than soil crete?
 
Angelika Maier
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or let's call it earth crete. Doesn't anyone have experience with that?
 
Tobias Ber
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heya... not really. i ve seen it done in a few videos (EDIT: indoors under earthen floor). they used 1 portland to 9 soil/dirt. but... it depends. you could make a test batch with that ratio.

how big do you wanna make that slab?

slope: i would make posts in the corners and screw 2x4 (straight ones) against it with the desired slope. use a level taped to another 2x4 to test if they re parralel. then use a 2x4 to scrape the concrete by using the fixed 2x4 as guidances.

you could probably add another inch of normal concrete to waterproof it.

colour and mosaic should work, but test.

i m not sure how long it will last because of moisture wicking up from the ground. concrete with not enough portland tends to loose it's binder when moist over a long time

EDIT: and you could paint it. there are sealers for concrete. but they re not natural. painting with lime might help a bit, but it would need to be reapplied often. lineseed oil? maybe?
you could pour test slabs and test different ratios and treatments. you could use a mold to pour custom-shaped pavers / stepping stones (this would be a good way to test your mixtures and sealers and leave you with at least a few usable pavers)
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Location: Southern Arizona
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You might try searching on "Soil Cement" instead.  I've seen where they have successfully used this for paving roads.
The simplest way would probably be to make sure the ground slopes appropriately before starting.  Rent or borrow a rototiller (unless you already have one), break up the soil then just pour a 1/2-1" layer of cement on the ground and till it in, rake it smooth then maybe screed it with a long board, then spray water over it.
You could float and trowel it smooth, but for large slabs that requires expensive tools and skills that require quite a bit of practice.

An alternative would be to make cement stabilized adobe bricks/blocks (at least 1.5" thick) and then lay them out like pavers.
 
Travis Johnson
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I have made it, and there are various forms depending on the end product.

The best is the rototiller method which is where you mix in the cement with the earth, then add water and mix again. The more passes you make, the better the the strength of the mix of course.

Another method which works well, especially for stiffening up driveways, is to just dump the cement and rake along the ground. In time the very fine dust will work into the soil, and then the moisture will harden it.

I am not sure I would drive my bulldozer across either types, but it is a nice halfway point between true concrete and just earth.
 
Angelika Maier
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Thanks and good that this works.I will hire a rototiller no need to break my back. I won't add colour but maybe some mosaic old shards and such. I wonder why this is not used more often.
 
Peter VanDerWal
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Angelika Maier wrote: I wonder why this is not used more often.


As a guess, probably because it's not a significant cost savings.  The two most expensive parts of normal concrete is the Portland cement and the labor.   The cost of the aggregate (sand and gravel) is pretty minor compared to the rest.

Soil cement uses about the same amount of Portland cement and requires as much labor if not more, so you end up with a less durable product for only slightly less money.  As a guess, if you contracted out a long driveway, you'd save maybe 5-7% going soil cement instead of concrete.

On the other hand, I've made soil cement for small projects and it looks just like dirt.  So if you want a hard paved surface that blends in with the surroundings, it's hard to beat.

Note: If you're doing all the work yourself, and don't consider the cost of your labor,  then the savings for soil cement work out to around 25%.
 
After burning through the drip stuff and the french press stuff, Paul has the last, ever, coffee maker. Better living through buying less crap.
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