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Elm tree cracked  RSS feed

 
Posts: 151
Location: Cumming, GA
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I need some advice. This is an 8 year old princton american elm. Found this crack in part of the trunk. Should I cut this whole section out or just one of the limbs?
tmp_20140525_111032524938772.jpg
[Thumbnail for tmp_20140525_111032524938772.jpg]
 
john giroux
Posts: 151
Location: Cumming, GA
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Here is another view.
tmp_20140525_111045-1816962168.jpg
[Thumbnail for tmp_20140525_111045-1816962168.jpg]
 
john giroux
Posts: 151
Location: Cumming, GA
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I should have pruned that section out when I first planted it.
 
Posts: 205
Location: Midcoast Maine (zone 5b)
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john giroux wrote:I should have pruned that section out when I first planted it.



Probably. On the other hand, elm is known for growing like this, and is incredible twisted and hard to split*. I expect that crack to outlast most pine or birch trees nearby that look perfect right now.

* - seriously, I had some 8 inch diameter elm that a 24 ton splitter was unable to split.
 
Posts: 103
Location: Zone 5, Maine Coast
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You could cable together the separating limbs if you would like peace of mind.
 
john giroux
Posts: 151
Location: Cumming, GA
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The first photo doesn't show it well. But there is a half inch crack already that you can see thru. If it wasn't damaged already I might consider the cable.
 
pollinator
Posts: 239
Location: Northern New Mexico, Zone 5b
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You can use a through bolt. Maybe a half inch bolt with decent size washers. Use the bolt to draw it together as much as possible and let the tree heal the wound. Anyone who decides to cut it down will have a rude awakening if they hit it though.
 
Posts: 226
Location: South central Illinois, USA
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I'll vote for the through-bolt....

Have a piece of firewood in the shop now, just barely exposing a brown ceramic electric fence insulator, eaten up by the oak tree many years ago. I'm trying to figure out how to make it into a paperweight, with the insulator exposed....
 
john giroux
Posts: 151
Location: Cumming, GA
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A big wind storm broke that limb off. So should I take the other part off too?
tmp_20140606_104257-748836399.jpg
[Thumbnail for tmp_20140606_104257-748836399.jpg]
 
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