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Growing fruit trees on difficult terrain  RSS feed

 
Posts: 155
Location: PNW, British Columbia
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Hi Stefan,

Thanks for coming to answer some of our questions.



Some areas of my property are not what someone would consider good spots to plant fruit trees. If you don't look too closely, it just looks like hills with rocks and moss. However, those spots have good sun exposure and native trees (arbutus, douglas fir...) don't seem to have a problem growing there.

My questions are: do you think it is possible to grow say an apple tree on difficult terrain? How would you proceed to give that tree a decent chance?
 
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Posts: 119
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Sam Boisseau wrote:Hi Stefan,

Thanks for coming to answer some of our questions.



Some areas of my property are not what someone would consider good spots to plant fruit trees. If you don't look too closely, it just looks like hills with rocks and moss. However, those spots have good sun exposure and native trees (arbutus, douglas fir...) don't seem to have a problem growing there.

My questions are: do you think it is possible to grow say an apple tree on difficult terrain? How would you proceed to give that tree a decent chance?


Sam everything is POSSIBLE to those who believe. Do you want to put in the work to achieve it is the question. My take is 'It is easier to choose the right site, than to make the site right'. You don't seem to have the right site, so want to make it right. Possible but takes much more work. Move to a deeper soil site or grow what the site is best suited for. I'm not familiar with your part of BC, ask Gregoire Lamoureux of Kootenay Permaculture Institute about what is best in your area.
 
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