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Plants for DRY shade

 
pollinator
Posts: 1376
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I need some plants for dry shade, foodstuff and medicinal.
We are approx. in zone 9 get up to -5C /20F in winter overnight only.
Some months we have a lot of rain some months we don't and it can be dry for several months.
I have two spots in dry shade. One spot is only for smaller stuff the other bigger.
Who knows suitable plants?
 
Posts: 120
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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Lamium (deadnettle) are a large group of plants, medicinal, bee plants, attractive.

Geranium species

Just irrigate until established? Dry really is the problem more than shade.

Food crops is asking too much for dry shade unless you can irrigate until established.

Animals in dry shade eating the weeds that grow there best for food.
 
Posts: 93
Location: New England
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Shade can be good in warm climates because it will remain cooler. I am not sure which of these grow in zone 9 (in zone 6) but these grow in dry shade. Will fruit more in more sun if you can limb up the shade. Dry will also decrease fruiting. Keeping the soil covered with mulch, and with plants will keep the soil much moister.

Lowbush Blueberry (Adaptable)
Black Huckleberry (Adaptable)
Bearberry (Deep taproot)
Woodland Strawberry (Adaptable)

Black Cohosh (Big tuber)
American Ginger (Tubers between plants)

Sassafras
Hazelnut

If it is a limited area, maybe make it a pollinator area with spring ephemeral. Some of these are medical, and only need sun before the trees come out. Would search for woodland medical herbs native to your area.

http://www.mast-producing-trees.org/2009/12/native-plants-for-dry-shade/
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
Posts: 1376
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I thought the blueberries need a lot of water? But I only know the cultivars.
Yes it is a small area and I irrigate sometimes with the hose.
It rains here often but often not and then for month, Australia.
The Black Cohosh I tried from seed but it did not do me the favour to germinate, cold stratified and all.

 
Tim Wells
Posts: 120
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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If we are talking proper dry as in under a conifer canopy then then hazel, tubers and fruit will not do well unless irrigated. The fruit is prob the best bet but agree then you need more sun to balance the dry. The alpine tiny wild strawberry prob my best pick of above list.
 
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