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Plant ID - Pretty sure it's a type of bindweed...  RSS feed

 
Markus Laumann
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This vine has started taking over a bed where we brought in some new topsoil. We got some nice ground cherry volunteers from it but every good party has THAT GUY that comes along and tries to ruin it for everyone.

This thing acts like a bindweed but the flower arrangement doesn't match species I can find in google. I'd hate to kick out the groundcherry's BFF but it's getting really gropey with everyone at the party... A proper ID would go a long way to help finalize our guest list.

EDIT: More details...
Location - Baxley, GA (USDA 8A)
Grows in areas where we brought in some topsoil that recently became baked by a lack of summer rain.
There were black eyed peas planted in the area (ground cover) but deer took those out and we had these and ground cherries volunteer.
Also on that plot was a bag of "Cajun 15 Bean Soup" mix that we spread early in the summer as an experiment.



The flower bud after all the flowers are gone. At least he's not sporting a toupe...



This is the only thing I could find that actually showed the flower (what was left of them). Most of the bindweeds I see have one flower, not a bundle...



Here's our creep, cruising the dance floor...



Not sure if this helps, but here's a picture of his nether regions...



Here we see his alpha-male personality coming out. Always has to be on top...



We asked him to leave. This is what he showed us...



I tried to get a closer look and he spit these at me. Inside each one was four seeds in a typical bindweed shell. If I had to estimate, I'd say every flower "head" would hold about 80-100 seeds. You've been warned, ladies...
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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It looks like a successful vine. It does not look like field bindweed or hedge bindweed to me. Those are the ones I deal with.

The rolled up looking flower looks morning glory ish but in my experience bindweed and morning glory flowers have around five seeds per flower.
 
Tim Wells
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Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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Fallopia convolvulus?
 
Markus Laumann
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Tim Wells wrote:Fallopia convolvulus?


I don't think so, judging by the flower arrangement. I wish I had a picture of these flowers in bloom but it looks like there would've been about 10-20 small purple-white flowers in a cluster in a single head, not along a stem. We've been traveling quite a bit and my focus while home has been on my Mimosa tree pioneers (mid-summer transfers).

Maybe I should add some more details to help narrow the field. I live in Baxley, GA (USDA 8A) and this vine seems to grow in areas where we brought in some topsoil that recently became baked by a lack of summer rain. There were black eyed peas planted in the area (ground cover) but deer took those out and we had these and ground cherries volunteer. Also on that plot was a bag of "Cajun 15 Bean Soup" mix that we spread early in the summer as an experiment.


Matu Collins wrote:It looks like a successful vine. It does not look like field bindweed or hedge bindweed to me. Those are the ones I deal with.
The rolled up looking flower looks morning glory ish but in my experience bindweed and morning glory flowers have around five seeds per flower.


That's the kicker. So many flowers on one head makes me curious, but also scared. If it is a strangling vine I'm looking at a couple thousand more seeds being added to the soil if I let them go much longer.
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
69
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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Well, don't let em go! I ferment all bindweed plant parts before composing just in case.

The roots don't look like bindweed either. That's a good thing, the root growth patterns and strategies of bindweed are one of the trickiest things about it. Very brittle and very regenerative.

Whatever it is, fast growing vines are the toughest weeds to manage in my permaculture systems. Sun stealers that impede air flow!
 
Markus Laumann
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I finally caught some pictures of the flower when it's open. The fact that it only opens in the morning means it's probably in the morning glory family. If anyone wants seed, now's the time to ask. I'm baking it on the driveway right now in preparation for the trash.
Here we go...




 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
69
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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Beautiful photos, anyway. Those hairy leaves are distinctive. I'm not familiar with this plant
 
Markus Laumann
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Found it! I knew once I had a picture of the flower it would be easier to identify.

"Hairy Clustervine"
Jacquemontia tamnifolia

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/71746/
 
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