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ronald bush
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any of you hunt puffballs? my family has eaten them well before my time. they are popping up now in northern indiana.


i slice them, half inch thick, and peel the rind. coat them with seasoned egg wash and fry in butter till browned. you can also brush slices with melted butter then season and grill. i have also used them in soups. very mild flavor and easy to tell apart from the false ones. if its like white bread inside its a good one. any color to the inside and its past ripe.
 
allen lumley
pollinator
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Ronald Bush : I've been hoping that just after the NEXT ran for about a month now, had a nice soup full of barley and deaths trumpet/mouse ears for lunch
on monday, and had Angus beaf, new potatoes, and some fiddle heads from last spring tonight with lots of sour cream, which I find I like better than the
vinegar I usually use !
thanks for the update, We will keep our eyes open ! For the crafts !Big AL

Late note, oh yes my wife reminded me we did have some store-bought button mushrooms that were dark enough to be on sale cheap! A.L.
 
ronald bush
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i also found about ten pounds of sulfershelf/chicken of the woods. it was my first taste of these. they are very good and no poisoness imitations. i sliced it a sauteed it in butter and seasonings. it tastes like chicken with mushrooms!
 
Sean Abercrombie
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Location: southern Michigan
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Chicken of the woods is near the top of my list for edible foraging, takes on whatever flavor its cooked with, great chicken-like texture, and usually get pounds per find. I have found both L. cincinnatus (white underside-totally edible) and L. sulphureus (yellow underside-only the edges soft enough to enjoy) around here. Whatever I don't eat gets frozen and thrown in to the next batch of vegetable scrap stock. Also very prolific around here are tree puffballs and a very tasty variety of tall bushy coral mushroom.
 
Michele Robinson
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Hi, I'm new here and I'm trying to find out where I can find ink capped mushrooms. I've had them once before cooked in a recipe that my mom made and they were devine. I've since gotten the recipe but have had no luck finding them where. Anyone have any or know of any for sale? I'd really like to try my hand at my moms recipe for my birthday next month. If anyone knows of any, please let me know. I've looked online and found a jar of them, but it was from the U. K. I'm in Alabama and really don't want to run that high in price. For a small jar that is only 1/2 of what I need it is over $35 without shipping. So can anyone help me out? Thanks
 
M.K. Dorje Jr.
Posts: 127
Location: Orgyen, zone 8
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Michelle, is this the species you're talking about?:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coprinus_comatus

Shaggy Manes and other "Inky Cap" mushrooms are not sold online or in stores, because they all "melt" into an inky mess before you can sell or dry them. You either have to find your own fresh ones or grow your own, but you can't buy them. Hope this helps!
 
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