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Paul Stamets New Lecture - fungi, bees, trees, bears and resistance to viruses and colony collapse.

 
allen lumley
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Very profound, Real science done by real people ! I am posting this here' it will need to be posted to multiple Forum Threads ! A must read for any one who wants
to save All The Bees

http://youtu.be/DAw_Zzge49c?list=UU7MRhTq4E2CYwXNIwDjA3NA

For the Good of the craft ! Big AL
 
Judith Browning
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this is great, Al! I went ahead and embedded it here.

 
Druce Batstone
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Fantastic. Thanks for posting.
 
Bill Bradbury
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Wow!
 
Miles Flansburg
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Nice! I sure hope there are folks in "power" who are sitting up and noticing and getting behind Pauls work!

So the picture he showed of the "birch" trees looked like my aspen. Are aspen trees a birch? Will those fungi grow on my aspen?

Does the wood chip mulch, that the bees were digging in, have to be a certain type of wood?
 
mike mclellan
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Location: Helena, MT zone 4
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Miles,
Agreed those trees looked more like aspen.

We should all try to more closely observe our woody mulched growing areas to see if this phenomenon is perhaps even more common than just on beeches and spruce. Heck, Colorado blue spruce is so widespread here in Rocky Mountain country being used as an ornamental tree, that many of us should watch closely to see if bees visit simple wounds from pruning or branch breakage to see if the local bees use them in a similar way.

Judith,
This information presented by Stamets is astounding at so many levels. The sum of the parts of the natural world so greatly exceeds our ability to even conceive of the synergies between living species. Thank you for posting it here.
 
John Saltveit
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Chaga mushroom grows on birch trees. Birch is very closely related to aspen, so they can appear like each other.

The wood chips in the mulch weren't what the bees were seeking. They were using the mycelium as a medicine against viruses and diseases.

This was a really interesting talk. Thanks for posting it.
John S
PDX OR
 
Miles Flansburg
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Yes, but doesn't the mycelium need the wood to form?

If so then does it have to be a certain type of wood that forms the specific mycelium which the bees were seeking?

If not what substrate was used to get the right kind of mycelium?

I would like to replicate the bed he showed.
 
John Saltveit
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Each kind of mycelium comes from a different species and type of wood. Chaga grows on birch, normally standing whole trees. Hypholoma capnoides grows on conifers, but garden giant (the one he was talking about), stropharia rugoso annulata, grows on hardwood chips, but doesn't grow very well on whole wood logs. Some grow primarily on rotted wood. Agaricus grows on rich soil (permies ha ha), some grow on insect cadavers. Some are parasitic, like the honey mushroom and grow primarily on living wood and kill the tree. They can then continue growing on the tree they have just killed. The kind he was talking about which is known as garden giant, wine cap and King Stropharia, is one of the easiest to grow in the yard and get edible mushrooms. THe spawn is widely available. It is usually bought in bags.

He also talked about the hollow of a tree. There would normally be rotten wood and therefore mycelium inside the hollow log or tree, as at least part of it is being colonized by the mycelium. That could be any kind of tree.

One effective strategy is to make sure that old wood is in your yard. I leave it in the soil, with some exposed. It's good for the soil, especially if you're growing trees and shrubs, as they need that fungal material in the soil. It's also good for the soil food web in general in your soil. The mycelium will naturally be attracted to the wide variety of mycelium growing on all the different types of wood. Then the bees will be able to choose what kind of mycelium they most want. Penicillin and other medicines come from mold and fungi. Another crucial strategy that I use every year is to add wood chips, which will then be taken over by some kind of mycelium, which the bees can then choose to eat for medicine if that is the species that they want.
John S
PDX OR
 
Eva Taylor
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Paul stamens is just the best, this type of work is what I dream of doing- why I love permaculture. Thanks for posting this!
 
Susan McGuinness
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Every sentence has profound implications. Thank you so much for bringing this to our attention.
 
Scott Strough
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I agree with Bill. Just WOW!
 
allen lumley
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O. K., Now do a google search for '' Mother Tree'' ! Most likely you will want to watch the paul stamets video again !Big AL
 
patrick Duthoit
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Paul Stamets......my man!
 
allen lumley
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_Just a closely related subject !

http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/meet-worlds-largest-living-organism

And Check-out " Mother Tree "

for the good of the crafts ! Big Al



 
cd shahan
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Location: N.W. Washington
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Thanks for posting this GOOD NEWS!!!

I would like to speed up this process and add woody material.

How can I make "MycoHoney"? -neutraceutical made from polypore mushroom

Nutraceutical Definition - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutraceutical



 
allen lumley
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cd shahan :that's a really good question, My quick answer is that probably besides paul stamets (and the Bees) there is not a 1/2 dozen people who have a clue !

Hopefully I am wrong, lets see what other answers we get here! And you can always share your research here as this is important to everyone on the planet .

for the good go the CCrafts! Big AL
 
Cj Sloane
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Has anybody taken Paul up on his call for citizen scientists? There was an email address of bee@fungi.com but no further instructions.
 
Nick Kitchener
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I've emailed him so will hopefully see shortly what he has in mind. Things will be frozen up my way until May 2015, so there is plenty of time to digest this information. Right now I'm rather dumbstruck at the implications of this discovery.

 
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