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Intensive Rotational Grazing And Ecoli  RSS feed

 
Jeff Jefferson
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Im considering starting a rotational grazing plan on roughly one acre of land, I would "jump start the system" with a cover of about 1/4th of an inch high. I would likely be using rabbits / goats / chickens. I guess my question is how would one help prevent against ecoli in a rotational grazing "food forest" system?
 
Brett Andrzejewski
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Location: Buffalo, NY
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Hello Jeff,

What animals are you considering raising on an acre of land? In New Mexico I have read examples of intensive rotational grazing on around 20 acres. 3/4 of the land is allowed to rest and the E-coli are exposed to NM's high altitude UV radiation and desiccating environment killing most pathogens.
 
Jeff Jefferson
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Rabbits, Goats and chickens
 
Brett Andrzejewski
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I must have skipped the the animals when I first read your post. Unfortunately, i don't have any experience on that scale with those animals. Perhaps someone else will offer some tips.
 
Rob Browne
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Location: Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia
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I would rethink the goat bit. On one acre it would be a big ask. With the rabbits and chickens you could sequentially graze a small area with the rabbits and when you move them on put the chooks in there. If you have your areas worked out right the animals will not need to be reintroduced to an area till it has recovered (that is why the goats would be a problem as they eat much more). Start with a small stock load and don't get sucked into stocking for the best season, stock for your worst season so you don't end up with a dust bowl. Sod seed other species in when you move the animals on to increase the diversity.
 
Milo Stuart
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Location: Mendocino Coast, CA
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A couple of sheep might be the ticket.. We have Icelandic/Shetlands. Awesome breeds, small, hardy and will eat most things but do better on pasture than goats.. Yeah 2 or 3 sheep per acre in a cool temperate climate is about the most you'd want to handle until you have food forest forage available.. (alder, willow, hazel, elder, comfrey etc.)
 
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