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suggestions for my side of the fence  RSS feed

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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our neighbors own 18 acres beside us on the west of us..and they are (bless their hearts) planting a lot of very large trees mostly all evergreen on the property line between us and them. My forest garden is on the east of this bunch of evergreens that they are planting, starting 20' inside of the fenceline. We have a lane along the fence that gives us access to the fenceline, however, I would like to plant SOME stuff along our side of the fence as well.

What my problem is now, is knowing what will grow in the west shade of their huge evergreens that they are putting in. The shade from the South and from the East is young right now, and deciduous, so there would be some morning and daytime sun that would hit this area, but eventually it will be more shady so any plants that are put there should be fairly shade tolerant.

I'm hoping to put in some deer food plants as this is a wildlife corridor and deer food plants will keep the deer away from our food forest  plants, my west barrier of that garden has chestnut, wild plum, black berry and raspberry plants right now and will have a hawthorne and buffalo berry soon.

as their evergreens are fairly cclose to the proeprty line i'm thinking that some of their trees may actually hang over our property line when full grown by a good bit.

but that might be many years yet.

I was wondering if some trees or shrubs that might work there might be things like service berry, paw paw, maybe the buffalo berry and the hawthorn and possibly guomi..there are a couple of baby white pines also on my side of the fence bu they are a bit to the south, so they will eventually make some shade as well.

suggestions gratly appreciated (oh walnut trees may effect the first (north) 30 to 40 feet of this area..and we will be keeping the wildlife/trail corridor open to lawn for a wide enough area to get a truck and tractor through
 
                              
Posts: 262
Location: Coast Range, Oregon--the New Magic Land
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HUCKLEBERRIESHUCKLEBERRIESHUCKLEBERRIES!!!
 
Emil Spoerri
pollinator
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just plant trees that get taller, faster!

gooseberries and currants are very shade tolerant and even pass on a disease that kills many pines hehe!
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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well i have a hedge going east to west near this area that is 9 different kinds of blueberry plants, so i don't think i'll do the huckleberries, but that was a good suggestion. I have both white pine and black currants here and do not have any blister rust, so evidently my black currant bushes nor white pines are affected..and i did think of transplanting a couple of currant bushes or taking cuttings from them for that area..as they seem to do well here and i love them. I have an order of 1 mtn ash, 2 paw paw, 4 goumi, 1 hawthorn, 1 buffalo berry and 2 service berry coming in the next week or so..I had planned on putting them elsewhere in my property, but now that the neighbors came up and planted all of those evergreens this last week, I'm thinking that they might do better in that area than where i had  origianlly planned to put them..what think?

I thought of putting the mountain ash in the center with a service berry on each side spaced about 16' to 24' apart, and then the 4 goumi spaced between them, 2 on each side of the mountain ash. Then on the north of this the buffalo berry and then a paw paw and then on the south the hawthorn and then the other paw paw..south of there will be one of the white pines and then 3 hemlocks and then south of that another white pine and a property line row of black spruce about 60' long.

the fruiting trees and shrubs would be getting windbreaks from the evergreens and from the picket fence while they are small, even..and they wouldn't be in any shade yet for a few years until the pine/sp;ruce trees grow much taller, so they would get a good start there.

i have also thought of underplanting them all eventually with things like edible daylilly, and possibly in the future htings like strawberry and other shade tolerant herbaceous plants.

I assume that there will always be a small amount of sun that will reach these trees and shrubs as the only really larger trees that will be growing in that area is the chestnuts, as the other trees are all either dwarfs or semi dwarfs except on the north or quite a ways to the SE
 
                              
Posts: 262
Location: Coast Range, Oregon--the New Magic Land
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FOr what it's worth, I have serviceberry/saskatoon growing everywhere here, naturally native. I noticed it mostly likes to grow up next to a bigger tree(fir or oak or maple). Probably likes its feet well shaded. It grows REALLY slowly. It's hard to transplant(as in digging up one from the forest, you have to take a really small one). It's beautiful in spring. It's hard to get the berries before the birds Huckleberries still taste better

But then I'm just talking from Oregon too. Maybe the serviceberry cousin there is different.
 
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