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Transplanting young trees

 
Jon Harshbarger
Posts: 5
Location: Pompey, NY USA
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Hi everyone- I am studying "Edible Forest Gardens" and have realized that over the past two years I've planted about 10 standard apples way too close together. Any advice on transplanting these with regard to timing, tools, pruning etc...
They are still relatively small (4 or 5 ft.) Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Galadriel Freden
Posts: 345
Location: West Yorkshire, UK
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You should be able to move them during winter or early spring if they are still in dormancy. So long as the ground isn't frozen, I'd do them as soon as possible. I just moved a small cherry tree myself, last month. They may not fruit this coming year if you move them--and it may be better to stop them forming fruits anyway so they establish good roots the first year. Good luck!
 
Aljaz Plankl
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Best time to plant is in fall when trees go dormant, well at least here in our cool temperate.
You can plant all winter, even in snow if you like, just don't do it when the ground is frozen, when you can't dig the soil anyway.
I would take a sharp spade and cut at least 1m diameter circle and try to get the whole sod with roots in it and transplant like that.
But don't go digging them out before you are clear about new location for them.
Prune them back half and go on with desired shape of a tree.
 
Jon Harshbarger
Posts: 5
Location: Pompey, NY USA
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Thank you so much for your quick responses. As soon as our ground thaws and the two feet of snow is gone, I'll get new sites prepped and move them. I'm in the Northeastern U.S. (upstate New York), so I've got a couple weeks yet. I just wanted to make sure that moving them wasn't a bad idea. I don't want to lose them as they are heritage varieties. Thanks again! This forum is awesome!
 
Jude Rubin
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You might consider staking when you transplant till the roots re-establish. Good that you caught them now, rather than later.
 
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