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Including tech people  RSS feed

 
alex Keenan
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I am seeing a new trend taking place.
Walmart and others are buying small tech companies for their employees.
A good technology team is now worth its weight in gold.
In many places good Internet access is available. So IT people can now work from remote locations.
It seems to me that many communities posted on permies are always in need of money (hard cash)
So what about developing systems that can support an IT team living within a permie community?

Also computer skills can be taught. So apprentice opportunities exist if you have a few well-functioning IT teams.
I have been in information technology for decades. I have a few acres and raise poultry and garden. I work in IT because I can make a living at it. I was fortunate in that I raised two kids who were able to grow up around animals and garden with me. It seems that if permies would make a effort they could incorporate IT teams as part of their communities. The IT teams can contribute in many ways. Give it some thought. With so many young people having to pay back student loans it is hard for them to live a permie life style. They have to have a way of making enough cash to pay off those loans.
 
Dillon Nichols
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As a currently-ex-techie... I've certainly met a lot of other ex-tech people. Seems like attracting people to an environment that helps them recharge could pull in those who otherwise might be changing fields. And even a a relatively part-time tech income would go a long way at most permie communities.

I'd expect 'systems to support' would mostly boil down to 'good, reliable internet'; given that, most anything else can be handled, but without that...
 
alex Keenan
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It would seem that if we have a good handle on the communications than we can build off-site work live places.
Here are some suggestions from the UK

The 13 best places in the world to work remotely
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/11363335/The-13-best-places-in-the-world-to-work-remotely.html

General overview of Internet access in USA
http://gizmodo.com/americas-internet-inequality-a-map-of-whos-got-the-b-1057686215

The US Department of Agriculture, for example, will offer between $40 million and $50 million to rural carriers that invest in bringing broadband in rural areas. According to a report from FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, 53 percent of rural Americans have no access to high-speed Internet, which he defined as capable of downloading content at 25 megabits per second.
http://www.cnet.com/news/president-obama-presses-for-high-speed-internet-for-rural-americans/

How about hitting up some of the Silicon Valley Billionaires?
http://www.quora.com/How-many-billionaires-are-there-in-Silicon-Valley
 
Dillon Nichols
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'Good, reliable internet' probably means a range of different things to different people.

Tyler of goingslowly.com kept doing remote work while biking all over north america and europe, he talks about connectivity options here: http://goingslowly.com/internet

The folks @ technomadia work from their bus while fulltiming around north america. From what I recall, their connectivity choices and costs imply it's lucrative work. And they've turned information on mobile internet into an income stream via a dedicated website, handbook, and even a subscription service... http://www.rvmobileinternet.com/

If the employment pays enough, and the bandwidth demands are low enough, some of these mobile options could allow cheaper/more remote properties to work... Or, since food forests are so resilient, one could buy half a dozen remote properties from Arizona to Alaska, plant a food forest on each on, and move between them as the mood/season strikes!


If one was considering property which supposedly had good internet available, and that was critical... I'd insist on having it hooked up, to a laptop in an empty field if need be, and confirming functionality before closing on on the property. I've read a number of horror stories about dealing with the telecoms when you're at the edge of access and have no other options...

 
It's in the permaculture playing cards. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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