• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Composting Pine Bedding with Phoenix Oyster - Worthwhile? Anyone Done It?

 
anna swing
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have about 10-20 gallons of waste pine sawdust each month. The dust comes from equine bedding pellets which I am using as cat litter. No solids, lots of urea. The volume is too much for my compost piles to cope with.

I've been thinking of trying to grow some Phoenix oyster mushrooms in a separate sawdust pile. I don't want to eat them - I just want something that will break down this sawdust more quickly. I'm especially curious about whether or not this would work if I don't pasteurize the sawdust before adding the spawn. There sure doesn't seem to be much bacterial or fungal activity in the pile now, so I'm not sure that there's much to kill.

Has anyone tried this or something similar?
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 1998
61
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would think that they would need adequate moisture. Mushrooms don't grow as well on pine as on fir, spruce, or hemlock. Most edible mushrooms that grow on pine are mycorrhizal mushrooms.
John S
PDX OR
 
anna swing
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's a really good point. I've been looking at super saturated piles as the snow melts, but now that you mention it, they seem to be already drying out while everything around them is still saturated. I wonder what would happen if I mixed in rotting pine from the woods.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!