John Suavecito

gardener
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since May 09, 2010
John likes ...
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
Food forest in a suburban location. Teaches grafting and helps people learn how to grow food. Involved with a local food exchange group. Shares cuttings and knowledge with schoolchildren.
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Recent posts by John Suavecito

Great source, Harry!

John S
PDX OR
5 days ago
I think part of the problem with the image of permaculture is that it is complicated.  Most people are very busy. Raising kids, working long hours, taking care of parents, etc.

I think we need to do a better job of inviting people in and saying, "Great, you're growing a tomato plant."  I was always interested in foraging and growing food, riding bicycles and recycling.

What really got me excited about permaculture was seeing the more in depth ways in which it helps us, helps nature, and could continue to help MANY people.  If people can feel ok about taking little baby steps, I think they

will feel positive about gradually learning more and experimenting more with it.

Some of the very complex, "I'm more sustainable than you are!", and arguments can make permaculture seem not worthwhile given limited time.  Make permaculture fun again.

John S
PDX OR
1 week ago
Pindo/Jelly Butia palm is marginal in zone 8. We're zone 8 here. I babied one for a couple of years and it died the first winter out. Chaemerops Humilis or Trachycarpus fortunei would work better for more reliable hardiness.

John S
PDX OR

1 week ago
Sounds like a great project Ben.

You might look into growing pioppino mushrooms Agrocybe aegerita? Black poplar mushrooms. They will grow better where you're at than up here.

John S
PDX OR
1 week ago
Great idea, Connor:
Yes, you would have to have at least 2, maybe 3 farms, due to the climatological differences of the plants-temperate or tropical. Sweet potatoes can grow in some temperate areas but produce very little in some. They do well in semi-tropical places like Georgia and Texas.  

The yield I get from my food forest is way more than you could get from the same space in monoculture.  It's pretty clear that your overall yield is bigger, but it may not be more for one single crop.  In addition, I can grow organically and improve the soil quality and contribution of insects and fungi over time , rather than gradually draining their value as conventional agriculture does.

As others have said, there is no ecological problem with large scale. The issue is organizing the people over time to take care of it, so that gradually nature will benefit but also do part of the work.

John S
PDX OR
1 week ago
My wife, who actually  knows about sewing, confirms that the slits will allow the t-shirt to expand enough to become a much larger bag.  She's also a physics teacher so she gets it. I am a little lost on all the details. I thought it was so it would breathe when filled with produce.  I think this is a spectacular project. I have had so many great adventures and memories in some of these T shirts that I love the idea of finding a way of preserving them and helping the ecosystem.
John S
PDX OR
2 weeks ago
I have many plants that you could take cuttings from in the fall and they would grow root systems by Spring 2020.
John S
PDX OR
1 month ago

James Landreth wrote:

John Suavecito wrote:Just remembered. I also have plum seedlings, Euro and Asian. Many edible weeds and some culinary and medicinal herbs too.'
John S
PDX OR



The plum seedlings would definitely make good rootstock. Do you think if allowed to grow ungrafted they would produce decent fruit? I've heard that stone fruits grow fairly true but I'm hesitant



The plums are delicious and producing in my yard.  I have two types of Euros and more than two types of Asian, so depending on size of project, I can provide a few. They also can be grafted upon. Remember, a preposition is a terrible thing to end a sentence with.

John S
PDX OR
1 month ago
Just remembered. I also have plum seedlings, Euro and Asian. Many edible weeds and some culinary and medicinal herbs too.'
John S
PDX OR
1 month ago
James-
As discussed earlier, I have many hawthorn seedlings. I also have a quince tree for you.  When you prune the quince (necessary in PNW, but best done in dry weather), plant the cutting and it will grow into a tree, as long as it's planted November to April.  Graft a compatible pear onto it.  It's the #1 dwarfing rootstock for pear.  

I also have many apples that have self-seeded. Most are not yet grafted.  

I agree, October is the good time to plant: 96 F here today. 97 tomorrow.
John S
PDX OR
1 month ago