• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

inoculant for gleditzia triacantos ,gleditzia julibrissim or other dryland nitrogen fixing trees

 
boris packes
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hi ,permaculture friends!!
i live in ibiza , an island in the mediterranean sea.
i´m looking for an nitrogen fixing inoculator for gleditzia triacanthos and albizia julibrissim,
someone nows what kind of inoculant they need?
and where to buy it?
i tried with the native earth from here, buy there is no apropiate bacteria in the soil, y also tried with worm cast, buy nothing...
or may be someone has had succeed inoculating other nitrogen fixing trees for dry clima?
so far the only native growing tree that i have found with nodules here was the acacia dealbata.

thanks.
 
David Wood
Posts: 50
Location: Sth Gippsland and Melbourne
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't help you with your inoculant query, Boris, but let's hear it for the other species you mention, Acacia dealbata, as a trooper in the world of farm forestry.

We have dealbatas on our block that are getting on for 80cm DBH. We have some planted about ten years ago that are over 30cm DBH already. And this period includes about 5 years of drought. David Holmgren speaks of some at Jackies Marsh in Tasmania that were 30m high and up to 1m DBH. A tough pioneer species in our area they will pop up from the seedbank in paddocks where stock are excluded. This means they are germinating and growing in a thick sward. The timber is attractive and according to various references usable for cabinets and similar uses. They are leguminous. They do best and live longer in high rainfall areas but there are provenances from drier regions. For anyone contemplating growing them in a drier zone in Australia they are likely to be water stressed, get borers which will affect the timber quality and die younger that will be the case in wet areas. But they make a reasonable firewood so even if they're rubbish for timber that's another use.

We're growing some as a single species plantation and as a quick timber tree amongst slower growing species.

A tree well worth considering for some sites.
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic