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Brown pee spots  RSS feed

 
Wilbur McGillicuddy
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My dog pees in the yard all the time, usually no big deal. He doesn't seem to have any favorite spots. But sometimes I get a big brown spot that looks like I sprayed grass killer right on it. What is the best way to rejuvenate this spot? Should something else be sprayed/poured down to try and flush away whatever killed the grass?

Why sometimes and not other times? I'd have no grass anywhere if dog pee did this every time
 
Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Years ago at a veterinary convention I listened to a talk about brown lawn spots. The speaker had done some casual experiments using dog urine he had collected. He determined that the more concentrated the urine, the more apt it was to kill the grass. He also discovered that if he poured at least an equal amount of water on the spot after the urine had soaked in, the grass was not killed.

Conclusions:
... Hose the urinated area, or dump a bucket of water on it.
Or
...Do something to encourage the dog to drink more water so that the urine isn't so concentrated.
Or
...Set up a potty area and train the dog to use it.

The assumption that people make is that the urine is too acidic. But this person did not find a correlation between acidity and grass kill. By the way, dog urine, like human urine, is mildly acidic. The pH doesn't fluctuate wildly, but the concentration can.

One more point, he found a connection between lush growing grass and urine kill. The more lush and fertilized the lawn, the more sensitive it appeared to be to urine kill. He was using Kentucky blue grass lawn for his trials.
 
Wilbur McGillicuddy
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Well my lawn is mostly hardy weeds so you'd think they could stand up to some pee

Thanks for the info. In my case I probably would not notice the dog going such that I could flush the spot with fresh water. I'm out doing my chores and he's helping by sniffing things and chasing butterflies.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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One more point, that I've noticed with my own dogs. For what it's worth....and I did no scientific approach......

Before my farm dogs were neutered, their urine sometimes killed grass out in the pastures. Since neutering them, I haven't noticed the grass kill. Perhaps intact males tend to have concentrated urine more so than neutered? Maybe I should did out the refractometer and check.
 
Felicity Broad
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Hi Wilbur

There is a great product called Dog Rocks. They are 100% natural, you pop them in your dogs water bowl, and they filter the nitrates out of the water (this is what causes the burnt/brown spots). I would highly recommend
 
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