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Fall/winter cover crop.

 
Posts: 67
Location: Eastern Shore, Maryland
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This is my first year with a permie garden. While it is small, I still want to use cover crops this winter. I was thinking a mix of daikon and fava beans, planted around September. I would use winter wheat (an accident from last year's sheet mulching - live seeds in the straw) but here we are basically in june and the plants are still going strong.
 
Posts: 77
Location: Netherlands (moderate maritime climate)
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http://extension.umd.edu/learn/september-vegetable-tips mentions some additional cover crops suitable for your climate and/or location.
 
Posts: 166
Location: Kentucky 6b
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I would personally go with wheat, impossible to mess up and forms a dense mass of roots to hold the soil in place, if that's what you're going for.
 
Dougan Nash
Posts: 67
Location: Eastern Shore, Maryland
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Blake Wheeler wrote:I would personally go with wheat, impossible to mess up and forms a dense mass of roots to hold the soil in place, if that's what you're going for.



As I stated, I have had trouble getting rid of it come spring time. I don't want to uproot it either.
 
pollinator
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Almost anything will survive a mild winter in your climate assuming a good microclimate for the garden beds.

What does the soil need? Pick something to feed the soil that you can eat, too, if it doesn't die. Your choices are good, you could add several other types of beans, buckwheat, or winter greens like kale that you can eat most of the winter.

gift
 
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