• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • paul wheaton
  • Devaka Cooray
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mark Tudor
  • Pearl Sutton

Couple of questions on Fukuoka San's natural farming  RSS feed

  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,

I have a couple of questions.

1. How did Fukuoka san managed rice seeds fallen from previous harvest? Typically rice seeds fall during harvest which germinates and grow. Won't it interfere with his next crop, which is wheat?

2. One straw revolution says - If seeds are sown while the preceding crop is still ripening in the field, those seeds will germinate ahead of the weeds..what is the logic behind this? Typically both weeds and sown seeds are sitting in the soil, won't this result in both weeds and sown seeds germinating?



Regards,
Nandan
 
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I will try to answer your question.

You have seed 1 and seed 2.  Seed 1 is now a mature plant ready to drop seeds in about a month, you sow seed 2 it starts to grow, you cut down seed 1 depending on what you're doing. Some seeds fall from seed 1, but seed 2 is ahead of seed 1. Seed 2 has a vigorous advantage and will choke out most of seed 1.

Off topic do you have any Happy Hill rice seed available for USA?
 
Nandakumar Palaparambil
Posts: 25
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dear Collins,

Thanks for the reply.

One more thing I heard was that some seeds germinate only at the beginning of a season..Right now I have sown a local variety which is of 8 months duration and they don't interfere with next crop.

Yes, I can send you some happy hill rice seeds, may be around 20 seeds. My email  - p_k_nandanan@yahoo.com



Regards,
Nandan
 
Posts: 66
Location: Zone 4B, Maine, USA
11
books chicken forest garden homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nandakumar Palaparambil wrote:
I have a couple of questions.

1. How did Fukuoka san managed rice seeds fallen from previous harvest? Typically rice seeds fall during harvest which germinates and grow. Won't it interfere with his next crop, which is wheat?

2. One straw revolution says -  If seeds are sown while the preceding crop is still ripening in the field, those seeds will germinate ahead of the weeds..what is the logic behind this? Typically both weeds and sown seeds are sitting in the soil, won't this result in both weeds and sown seeds germinating?



I know you asked the questions a long time ago, but I hope I can add a little:

1.)  All the rice harvested was by hand using s sickle. I'm not sure how much rice seed would drop in this harvesting, but his plants were known for being shorter/heavier plants than what you'd typically find in a rice paddy. Perhaps they didn't drop as much? Also remember weeks before the rice harvest he had over-seeded wheat and white clover in seed balls. By the time the rice was harvested the succession crops were already established. So the rice would have a hard time competing. I don't know what winters in Shinkoku island were like but I'd guess rice would winter kill or people would have been trying to grow rice in the winter generally (it was a more valuable crop). Yet most farmers around Fukuoka left their rice fields fallow in the in winter.

2.)  Fukuoka was using a no-till system which does not allow the weed seeds buried in the soil to germinate (as they would following a plowing that brought them near the surface). Therefore the only weed seeds that could ever hope to germinate in his fields were new weed seeds introduced by wind or animals - and they would have to out-compete the white clover that always grew under his rice or winter grain crops. Since his fields were continuously-cropped weed seeds had a very hard time germinating - they were always shaded out by his crops. Not to say that there were zero weeds in his fields, just very few. When he sowed his succession crop with seed balls, the clay seed balls themselves would store the rain and allow the crop to germinate and establish underneath the current crop as it was ripening. He timed it perfectly such that just before the the young succession crop was going to be starved for sunlight the ripened first crop was harvested to let the sun shine in. The succession crop (probably only 2-4 cm tall at the time the first crop was harvested) was walked upon during harvesting, but this never seemed to hurt it. Within a few days the first crop's straw was scatted over the quickly-growing succession crop. So the only weed seeds that would have a chance to germinate would already be much smaller than the succession crop and it's white clover - additionally they would have to grow up through the straw mulch, which the established succession crop had no problem doing.

Note the rice was grown with white clover like the winter grains (the clover both suppressed weeds and fixed nitrogen). The clover was able to out-compete the seedling rice in a dry field. So immediately after he harvested the winter grain and scattered it's straw, he flooded the rice crop for about 7-10 days. This would kill almost any weed, the rice didn't mind the flooding at all and grew well. The clover did NOT like the flooded conditions and weakened. He drained the fields while the clover was weakened, but still viable. As the field dried out the rice continued to grow very well and the white clover recovered and took over the open ground much faster than any weed could hope to.

I hope this helps!  
 
The harder I work, the luckier I get. -Sam Goldwyn So tiny. - this ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!