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polypore fungi to ID.... Berkeley's Polypore (Bondarzewia berkeleyi)  RSS feed

 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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this was just dramatic in our summer woods.....any ideas off hand?

Both clumps were equally large and soft still.
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Alex Veidel
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Maitake? I know it grows in clusters at the base of trees like that......
 
Judi Anne
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Berkeley's polypore
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Thanks Judy and Alex....it does look like (and the description sounds like) mature Berkeley's Polypore as illustrated here http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Mushrooms.Folder/Berkeley%27s.html

Edible when young and not all that great, I guess....but really cool looking

I really wish it were Maitake or at least Hen of the Woods.....

 
Judi Anne
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Hen of the woods is such great eating! I second your wish.


Berkeley's are dramatic and usually large (biggest I've seen was 50 lbs and filled a bucket seat) and more easily spotted than hens.

This is the time of year for berkeleys. Hens are more of a fall emerger.


One of the bondarzewia has some research showing specific activity against types of leukemia, but I must not have created a reference for that source. If I find the source Ill try to remember to come back and post it.
 
Alex Veidel
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Judith Browning wrote:

I really wish it were Maitake or at least Hen of the Woods.....



Aren't maitake and hen of the woods one and the same? There's also a "chicken of the woods", which is a different mushroom altogether.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Alex Veidel wrote:
Judith Browning wrote:

I really wish it were Maitake or at least Hen of the Woods.....



Aren't maitake and hen of the woods one and the same? There's also a "chicken of the woods", which is a different mushroom altogether.


they are the same....I didn't know that. I just know a very few edibles and am trying to learn a few more as they appear in our woods...Now I need to find out if it is 'chicken of the woods' or 'hen of the woods' that I have heard found here. thanks.
 
Alex Veidel
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Chicken of the woods tends to stand out. It's usually bright orange with yellow tips

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laetiporus

Also, I found a cool page that compares maitake with a couple polypore look-alikes, including berkley's:

http://americanmushrooms.com/edibles1.htm
 
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