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Oregon Black Truffle ?

 
Lisa Paulson
Posts: 258
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I found an odd fungi I have seen other years  forming in my hogfuel riding ring.  I could not get a picture of it as a horse went over it so I found the displaced fungi and put it closer to the protected fenceline and watered it for want of knowing what might help it colonize again.  It appeared to be very similar to the Oregon Black Truffle as described below ,  I have no idea if that could actually be there about 3 inches across , growing in August in southern coastal BC  ?
Excerpt below from the E Flora BC website:

The Oregon Black Truffle, Leucangium carthusianum (Figure 4), has a strong pungent fruity odor when mature, often like pineapple. The Oregon Black Truffle can be found with Douglas fir in coastal areas but can also be found in urban areas where people often think that they have found a lump of coal while gardening. It fruits from September to February.


 
Lisa Paulson
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In an effort to work closer to a natural rhythm I have been top dressing our fields with the horse bedding and had interesting results, composting the bedding did not produce nearly the proliferation of fungi that spreading the wood fibre and soiled manured bedding on fields, lawns and under trees, which tallied 13 different forms I saw in one day Nov 13th 2010.  If anyone can identify any of these, I have been looking to learn more about them.
One of the few I could identify was Shaggy Mane which is not pictured.








 
Lisa Paulson
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More fungi Southwest coast farm in British Columbia using permacultre ant opdressing areas with soiled stable bedding


 
Jorge Mar
Posts: 14
Location: French Pyrenees
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the 7th image is an Amanita muscaria in its early stage. Its poisonous and makes you see weird things 
The last photo is either a Lepiota sp. or a Macrolepiota sp. Depending on size. I think yours is a Macrolepiota. In this case, only M. Rahcodes isn't edible. You can know this mushroom because it turns red when you cut it. Beware with Macrolepiots because they can be confused with Lepiots, some of them are very dangerous.
 
M.K. Dorje
Posts: 153
Location: Orgyen
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Hi, I know the original post here is a bit old, but I thought I'd try to help you with identifying some of the mushrooms in your photos anyway. I think the mushrooms in the 4th photo are probably in the Panaeolus campanulatus group. The ones in the 6th photo might be Agaricus mushrooms, possibly A. osecanus or A. bitorquis. (Next time, be sure to photograph the gills by flipping over at least one  mushroom, that way they are easier to identify.) The Agaricus genus contains some of the best edible species, as well as some members of the toxic "lose your lunch bunch". Agaricus mushrooms can be identified by pink gills that change to a chocolate brown color as the spores mature. Check out David Arora's classic book "All that the Rain Promises and More..." for more info on Agaricus- a genus well worth knowing for permaculturists.  I agree with Jorge, the ones in the 7th photo look like Amanita buttons, probably A. muscaria. Be sure to read R. Gordon Wasson's "Soma: Divine Mushroom of Immortality" for more info. As for Oregon black truffles (Leucangium carthusianum), they are indeed found underneath relatively young Douglas-fir, at a depth of 4-10 inches beneath the soil surface, with a charcoal black exterior and white marbled interior. The "NATS Field Guide to North American Truffles and Truffle-like Fungi" by Matt  and James Trappe is the best book on this topic. The "natruffling.org" website has more info on this one, too.
 
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