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Mushroom identification

 
April Leblanc
Posts: 1
Location: Idaho
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I have grown oyster mushrooms in straw for a few years, and foraged Morels this spring. I found these in central Idaho at about 5,000 feet. They were in a pine forest near a creek in decomposed granit and moss. Some small animals had been eating a large number of them. And they were vey slimy and wet to the touch. No bluing, and smell good. I did NOT taste them. Bolete? Safe to eat?
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david falkowski
Posts: 5
Location: LI NY
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I would start here: Slippery Jack

https://www.google.com/search?q=slippery+jack&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=667&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAmoVChMIiezu0sPTyAIVwx4eCh2aywBv#imgrc=AEaRfZFlSy5KcM%3A

They are common here in the North East. The skin on the cap is slimy and peels off readily, the cap skin is removed before cooking and eating.

Happy hunting, Dave
www.openmindedorganics.com


 
Jed Vraiefaux
Posts: 6
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Most likely Suillus Brevipes given the short stem. One of the more palatable slippery jacks in my opinion.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suillus_brevipes

Self Indulgent Editorial Note:
There is enough food in the world to feed 100 billion people (scarcity mentality has been drummed into us all, snap out of it!) Millions of pounds of mediocre tasting mushrooms are waiting to be harvested, flavored, seasoned and appreciated. Let's feed ourselves and the poor, whilst thumbing our nose at the fascist food cartels. Death to the existing order.

 
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