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ID this tree - paulownia tomentosa

 
pollinator
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Saw this unfamiliar-to-me tree on Bainbridge Island in Washington state this fall. Big tree, obviously planted as a pair in front of an old house that's now in the center of Grand Forest park. The matching tree was a decade dead, but several more had popped up nearby, so it seems suited to the area. So, what is is?
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The tree!
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Unripe seedpod/nut? from this year and the empty husk of a dead one from last year on top of a leaf. The knife is 5" long for size reference.
 
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Looks like it could be a paulownia, paulownia tomentosa. Beautiful purple blooms, but can be a bit invasive.
 
D Nikolls
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Yup, pictures of paulownia tomentosa look like a perfect match; thanks Chad!

Aside from the risk of it spreading excessively, it sounds like an interesting tree; fast growing, ornamental, and produces light, strong, stable, rot resistant wood.

There were about 4-5 smaller trees present in the area; the old tree was right at the edge of a substantial west facing meadow. So, spreading, but not hyper-aggressive in my mind... though I don't know if any measures were being taken to contain them.
 
chad Christopher
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Active mowing when the green seed pods drop can help. A bagging mower is better. Isolates the feathery seeds. Vigouous cover, or thick maintaned mulch being another method. Idealy, do not fertilize the soil within 3x the diameter of the canopy. Shallow tilling mixed with active warm-hot sheet mulching will keep new growth under control.
 
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