• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

texas food forest

 
wayne fajkus
Posts: 430
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've got 2 (dry) creek beds. One is loaded with oaks, cedars, Mustang grapes, etc, etc. The other one has 0 trees. I think home construction up hill from me may have rerouted the creek. Looks like a pretty good starting point for me cause its bare.

Last year I planted 4 pecans, this year I planted 2. Spaced along this channel like nature would/should do on its own. It was dirt/easy digging to get them in the ground. Next year I will follow up with peach, plum, pear. Possibly add in some blackberry.

Am I missing anything here? I really think I found a great starting point. My other option was to start planting trees in other creek bed with a gradual removal of existing trees. (Pecan replace oak. Peach replace cedar, etc). I'm a firm believer in planting trees where they want to be, which is where they are now. I think I found a loophole. I'm starting with nature's starting point.
 
Kyle Smith
Posts: 12
Location: Ft. Worth, Texas - Zone 7a
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You might want to consider adding figs, turks cap, apple, kiwi, lettuce, and asparagus to your creek beds too. I've got them in my food forest and they are doing well. Also, you can grow quite a few type of other grapes. I logged some junipers from a few of my friends' ranches and used them to build a few trellises for my grapes, kiwi, and blackberries since the posts will last a lifetime. Just some ideas. Have fun building up the creek beds.
 
Steve Farmer
Posts: 365
Location: South Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
2
forest garden greening the desert trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How much water does the dry creek get? Any flow at all from upstream property during rains or just what falls on your own property? Do you plan to irrigate?
 
wayne fajkus
Posts: 430
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve, after a 12" rain event it flowed (trickled) for 6 weeks. Small events (1/2" to 1") it flows maybe 1 to 2 days before it soaks in and not visible.
We are halfway down a large hill, we call them mountains. It's texas hill country. It comes down from the hill. I think seepage is what kept it flowing for 6 weeks cause water was coming out out like a spring at the beginning of my creek, not from above ground.

I'm going in stages as I figure out next steps. Asparagus is a definate. I'll look into other recommendations.

I have an IBC tote on a trailer to keep it irrigated. It's pulled with a tractor. Has 12v pump hooked to a battery with solar panel to keep it charged. It works well.
 
Steve Farmer
Posts: 365
Location: South Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
2
forest garden greening the desert trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Seems you have plenty of water for getting trees established.
Consider Leucaena Leucocephala and Gliricidia Sepium as your pioneer desert trees to establish the first shade.

If you're willing to spend some time irrigating in the dry season, then you should have few problems getting your peaches, plums etc established. Would be great to see pics of your progress.

Are you going to put some check dams in your creek? maybe you could turn your 6 week trickle into a 9 or 12 week trickle?
 
wayne fajkus
Posts: 430
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm focusing more on the other creek in regards to increasing flow. It's a better starting point. I've dug and dammed for a pond at lower part. Put in a check dam in higher part. Next thing is removing a 100 or so juniper trees
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic