• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Being your own Mechanic .. Brakes to Balers  RSS feed

 
                        
Posts: 148
Location: South Central Idaho
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use to do all my own work on my cars and I'm going to change the rear brakes on my RAV4 Toyota .. I've bought brake shoes, new springs and will get some high temp grease where the shoes rub on the face plate (corrected) .. coming off a mountain these babies get hot .. and I'll send the drums out to be resurfaced as recommended.

I notice a lot of recommendations have changed since 1957: don't just change one shoe .. dah .. don't put the old springs back on (get new) .. send the drums out each time, they need resurfacing to meet the new shoe lining .. or .. they are a wreck and need to be thrown away and replaced with new .. mark the hub and the drum to keep the balance .. don't blow the dust out .. it's toxic .. spray off with a can of liquid brake cleaner and catch the drippings .. gingerly try out the new shoes to make sure the job was done correctly, nothing flies apart and they are in adjustment .. don't jump in and assume everything is O.K. Congratulations .. now take the wife out to dinner three times on what you have saved. Maybe she will keep on washing your clothes.

I'm ready to retire my Hayliner 320 New Holland '50s .. the main sprocket is wobbling and the transmission is shot from too much neglect before I purchased it. I could have bought a new in line baler for $20,000 or a newer used but they were all in rough shape .. so I bought an $1,150.00 baler at a farm sale and I have put from $500 to $1,200 per year maintenance into it for five years.

Working on an old baler taught me a bunch. I know the parts that maintain the bale length because if they are old and slipping you deal with banana bales for a spell, picking up and stacking banana's an't fun .. I know how to time it and take the pressure off a small diesel by augmenting the bale chamber with a bale ski .. a plastic lining that requires 25% less horse power to bale and takes a marginal power tractor to doing just fine .. you can hear the difference. I know how to tie off busted strings or start new twine if a spool runs out .. I can replace a cotter bolt on the fly .. and I've memorized all the grease zerts on the knotter and the rest of the drive lines and parts and wheels, about 30 .. I know to blow the dust out after each use and to put away for the winter clean or see all the rust when the dirt catches the moisture and chews on your baler .. how to set the tension on the bale to get the right weight. Have repeat customers year after year .. give them a little off to pick them up in the field .. hear them tell you "my horses won't eat anyone else's hay .. they turn their noses up on it" .. I have to buy yours .. all the candy .. leaves .. baling at night which few others want to do any more .. no wetness or mold .. suppresses the immune system.

When do you bale? For here, without rain after seven days. Rake a day after every rain and reach under the windrow and pull out some hay and twist .. leave a three inch space between your two fists. If it breaks on the third wrangle .. bale! If it breaks on the sixth wrangle .. wait about two days. If it is breaking at four and a big rain is coming .. bale anyway .. throw coarse salt over each layer in the stack and it will cure a little wetness without spoiling .. timing is important .. stack it and tarp it and let it rain.

Call your swather operator and whoever else you use and give them a heads up about a week before you need them .. they appreciate that and will slip you into their sequence of jobs. Call at the last minute and then get silly with them and ..

There are the moments at night .. baling with the dew on to keep the tasty leaves from falling off .. lights on .. pheasants running up the wind rows .. moon coming up or going down ..  the way "   " changes the wind direction to blow the dust out of your face .. Venus coming up .. or during the day .. red tail hawks circling above and then dive bombing mice out in front of your tractor .. coming over the top and I have to jam on the brakes to keep from running over them while they catch and kill the mice. The glaring looks they give you for almost hitting them. Those times were priceless.



 
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

DustyTrails wrote: high temp grease where the shoes rub on the drum



umm I hope I'm reading this wrong but if you put grease between the drum and the shoe, not only are you're breaks not gonna do their job but the grease will eat the brake lining away in a matter of days
 
                        
Posts: 148
Location: South Central Idaho
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When you attach the shoe to the face plate .. there are three guides .. they get the grease .. you are correct .. not the drum.
 
                              
Posts: 262
Location: Coast Range, Oregon--the New Magic Land
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My hub does mech work on our vehicles and bulldozer (1956 or so td14, it just. will. not. die.) He just replaced the fuel pump and switchy thing in the suburban(which requires dropping the gas tank), 70$ in parts for a 800$ plus job, also does all the brakes(we also live on a long steep hill which is very hard on brakes), and etc.

WOrk on the bulldozer to keep that running is a wonder. Lots of sledgehammer work...

yup I'm proud of his skills!!!
 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

DustyTrails wrote:
When you attach the shoe to the face plate .. there are three guides .. they get the grease .. you are correct .. not the drum.



that sound better didn't think you meant it how I read it, but someone reading somethin like that on the 'nets and giving it a try is something I worry about.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

brice Moss wrote:someone reading somethin like that on the 'nets and giving it a try is something I worry about.



You mean a scenario like this?

 
Brice Moss
Posts: 700
Location: rainier OR
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yeah that kinda thing
btw you owe me a keyboard my tea came out my nose all over it
 
Would you like to try a free sample? Today we are featuring tiny ads:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!