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Intermittent Misting System  RSS feed

 
Jayden Thompson
Posts: 119
Location: Danville, KY (Zone 6b)
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Does anyone have a DIY intermittent misting system design that you want to share for plant propagation? I'm interested in rooting cuttings on a small scale, with the long term goal of scaling up to something bigger. I've found timers online for as low as $40-$50, and the rest seems pretty simple. But if ya'll have designs to share, it would help me to confirm whether I'm oversimplifying.

Thanks!
 
Todd Parr
Posts: 898
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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I set up a very small one by using an ultrasonic humidifier on a regular Walmart timer. It works great for small scale. I used plastic tubing (1" I think it was), made a hole in the humidifier output cover and piped the other end into a plastic tub I got at Walmart. I melted a hole in the tub and pushed the tubing into it.
 
duane hennon
gardener
Posts: 722
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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hi Dean,

I've not tried this but it seems reasonable

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pXZLnSaySY

2014 Rooting Blueberry Cuttings

he talks about his misting system
 
Rue Barbie
Posts: 70
Location: Coastal Southern California
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Years ago when I was starting lots of rose cuttings I set up an extremely primitive misting system. It was just a hose-end turn on/off, very inexpensive thing that I adjusted to a very fine spray. I had a 'table' on a slant, and it was covered with plastic sheeting that directed water into a container with hose attachment that let extra water, gravity fed, into a small pond.

I left the mist on during daylight hours, and off at night. The medium I used drained very well. The cutting leaves were always wet, but did not rot. Several people said to keep things this wet/damp would not work. But it did.

I do live in a very dry environment, and roses are plants that are perhaps less prone to water damage. But I got well-rooted cuttings with no problems. A species that might be more oriented to dry environments might not be as successful.
 
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