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Is there a way to prevent stored kudzu from germinating when I toss it to my livestock?  RSS feed

 
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I want to harvest some kudzu to feed my livestock. I'd like to avoid the kudzu invading my area. Is this possible at all? Is there any way to neutralize the seed and store kudzu as hay, or can kudzu hay not even germinate to begin with?

Maybe grinding it with a mill would be an option? I want to find a way to utilize this plant without destroying my area. There has to be a way to take proper precautions to use this plant.
 
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I would cook it in a solar oven--and then test it.

Or, a tactical nuke would do it.

 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Kudzu behaves a lot like Bermuda grass. If you want to use it as fodder it would be best to make sure it is fully dried, that way it won't take root.

You can also cook the leaves and eat them, they are pretty tasty when prepared like collard, turnip or mustard greens.
 
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This time of year, there's not going to be any seed in it, so you could go ahead and feed them. It doesn't flower and set seed here in Georgia until late summer, like September, and even then the pickings for seed pods are pretty slim (at least in my area).

Kudzu seed is pretty small, on the order of tomato seed size, so any mill that will grind all of the seed is going to turn the rest of your material into flour.

Don't be afraid of the reputation it has for being 'invasive'. It takes quite a while for a stand to get established, so if your livestock have a taste for it, they will keep it from getting out of hand. In addition, the kudzu bug is now becoming established, so it is no longer in an area without biological controls on its spread.
 
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