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Humanure compost start

 
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For my most recent compost pile start up I had a few more pails of compostables available than usual. There were 10 pails plus one third pail of kitchen compost. I was happy to see that the temperature of this fairly large start up climbed to 125 F within 7 days, definitely the fastest climb to the active zone that I have had. In the previous three piles I started with 2 to 4 pails each time and the climb to active temps was quite slow.
 
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Location: Swanton, MD
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What was in your compostables?   Humanure?  I would love to replicate these results.   It usually takes a month for me to get to 125°.
 
Wyatt Barnes
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10 pails of humanure, which in our household includes the contents of our sawdust kitty litter from 2 adult cats. We are an all in Jenkins style household, no other toilet on site. For the past few months our sawdust has been hardwood chainsaw sawdust which sat outside in an open pile for about 10 months. I keep a tarp spread out next to the pile on a slight slope and throw a few inches onto the tarp to dry in the sun. When I collect a bag of dry sawdust off the tarp I spread more. I have also started dumping the kitty litter container rinse water into the compost pail since the kitty litter itself is fairly dry overall. I am lucky that I have about 15 pails that I can use if needed, I do expect to eventually have at least three systems going so I have managed to accumulate enough pails for all three.
 
Nancy Troutman
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It takes me close to a year to get 10 buckets.  

How do you store those full buckets?   Covered?  What type of kitty litter do you use?
 
Wyatt Barnes
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Those ten buckets represent about a months worth from our household, two adults in our 50s, plus one adult in their early 20s for a few days once in a while, occasional use by someone else but not very often, we are a fairly quiet reclusive household. The kitty litter is what ever sawdust we are using for cover material inside at the time. I normally wouldn't have that many full pails on hand but I have been busy, tired and lazy for the last while and I also knew that I wanted to shift my harvest date back to July 1st. Next year I will probably shift a month earlier again to get to a spring harvest date for planting.
 
Nancy Troutman
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Location: Swanton, MD
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This explains a lot about the volume of buckets.   I use peat moss or potting soil as cover.   So my buckets are far more condensed with, uhmmm... poop.   I average 3 humanure buckets per 1 bucket of potting soil.  A 3cubic foot bale of potting soil lasts me a year.  

Do you have a separate pee bucket?  In the summer, my Pee bucket drains into a floor drain that flows into a 50 gallon drum of rain water, that is plumbed to a drip irrigation system.  In the winter it drains into the current compost pile.  

I have been seeding new compost piles with samples from the previous compost pile.   Did you do anything like that?

So is the differences in how we do things limited to 1) sawdust vs. soil, 2) kitty litter, 3) you get in 1 month what takes me a year to acquire?

 
Wyatt Barnes
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Forgot to answer how I store full pails. I use 5 gallon plastic pails, most with handles and all with snap on liquid seal lids. When a pail is almost at the " too full to be comfortable " point in the frame I add the latest used kitty litter along with the first rinse water from the kitty litter container. I then snap a lid firmly on and move the pail to a discreet covered storage area in our entrance way. Normally it would stay there for about a week and then travel with two other full pails to the compost pile to be emptied but if the weather is bad or I am busy or any other excuse that keeps me from the compost I move the full pails to the back yard or right to the compost pile to await dumping. With the lids on I have stored pails for up to 2 months in the colder weather with only a slight change in contents and no problems.
Our system does not divert urine. I expect that makes a huge difference in the composting as well as the use of hardwood sawdust as a cover material. It also means a difference in overall volume of sawdust used and compostables produced.
 
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