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Anyone interested in Queen Anne's Lace seed?

 
Craig Dobbelyu
pollinator
Posts: 1251
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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forest garden hugelkultur
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I've got a large section of field that I've put into recovery.  As a result I have a massive amount of QAL seeds.  I'm inclined to harvest some if anyone is interested in having some.  If there is such interest please say so below or in a PM and I will try to figure out how to make it work.  I'd probably set up a paypal link for a nominal payment to cover time, envelops and stamps.  Inside the US only ( sorry).  Not looking to make any real money just trying to cover costs and spread the permie love. 

Harvesting will be done this weekend and then once things settle down, I'll set up payment options and start stuffing envelops.  I have a lot of seeds of many sorts this year and am looking to off load some to my permie peeps.  I'll probably put out a list of items once the season winds down if anyone is interested.


Just let me know how much you may want and I'll try to make it happen.

Much love

 
Jay Vinekeeper
Posts: 77
Location: Northwest Lower MI
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QUEEN ANNE'S LACE?

Yes, I'm interested in seed bearing plants in general.  So allow me to ask a really dumb question ... WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR? 

Any unused field or roadside ditch in my neighborhood will have QAL in the mix of plants, and often dominating the site it is on.  For what purposes could a deliberately sown field be used?

What uses do you make of it?

Your thoughts and ideas are appreciated. 
 
Gilbert Fritz
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Location: Denver, CO
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Probably you already know this but . . . make sure it is not Poison Hemlock or Water Hemlock! They look much like Queen Ann's Lace/ Wild carrot, including the flowers. The Hemlocks are some of the most deadly plants in the Northern Hemisphere.

I love the look of QAL flowers!
 
Craig Dobbelyu
pollinator
Posts: 1251
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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forest garden hugelkultur
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Jay Vinekeeper wrote:QUEEN ANNE'S LACE?

Yes, I'm interested in seed bearing plants in general.  So allow me to ask a really dumb question ... WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR? 

Any unused field or roadside ditch in my neighborhood will have QAL in the mix of plants, and often dominating the site it is on.  For what purposes could a deliberately sown field be used?

What uses do you make of it?

Your thoughts and ideas are appreciated. 


You're right.  They are quite easy to find.  I just happen to have a shitload of them growing in a part of field that I'm currently rehabilitating.  My land was once a hay field and there is very little top soil left because of overuse and abuse from previous owners.  I have found that running pigs and chickens on the old hay fields has helped to bring up the dormant seeds of all these great nutrient/mineral accumulators.  QAL happens to be one that is deeply tap-rooted and very hardy in zones 3-9.   

Here's the wikipedia Daucus_carota

I'm particularly interested in their ability to loosen subsoils, attract pollinators and provide biomass to help rebuild soils.  Early in spring the exhausted dead plants leave a neat deep hole that makes it easier to sow other cover crops.  I've had some luck in getting clovers, brassicas, vetches and pasture grasses to establish themselves in areas that once had lots of QAL.  I'm not sure if it's a natural progression or what, but it is going in the right direction so I'm going with it.

The flowers are quite nice to look at and they can be used in flower arrangements if you were so inclined.  Some people eat the roots, but that seems to me to be a bit of a task to chew.  They get woody pretty early on in the growth stage.



 
Craig Dobbelyu
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Posts: 1251
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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forest garden hugelkultur
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Gilbert Fritz wrote:Probably you already know this but . . . make sure it is not Poison Hemlock or Water Hemlock! They look much like Queen Ann's Lace/ Wild carrot, including the flowers. The Hemlocks are some of the most deadly plants in the Northern Hemisphere.

I love the look of QAL flowers!


True.  very good point for sure.

I have looked at many of the ones in the field and have not be able to find any hemlock.  It's not impossible that there is some in the patch, but I doubt it.  They are very similar and I wouldn't consume anything that I couldn't 100% ID. 


I thought that there might be other permie people who are in need of these beneficial "weeds" for some of the same reasons that I let them grow here.  I've seen prices for seed as high as  10 dollars for a packet.  That seemed kinda crazy to me, so I thought I'd see what I could do with this crop of seed I have here.  Maybe make a little cash to spent on a new tree or something.  We'll see how it goes I guess.
If there isn't enough interest, I'll just open that paddock to the pigs and chickens again. 

 
Nick Watkins
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Gilbert Fritz wrote:Probably you already know this but . . . make sure it is not Poison Hemlock or Water Hemlock! They look much like Queen Ann's Lace/ Wild carrot, including the flowers.


That's why I like to affectionately call it "Queen Anne's legs", since QAL has hairy stems and the toxic lookalikes do not (if I recall correctly). Easy for the young ones to remember, too, so long as they're aware that shaving the legs was not a thing in 16th century England.
 
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