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Low-tech venting options for cathedral ceilings?

 
Posts: 91
Location: PNW
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I can't find much info on venting indoor air when there is no forced draft heating used. We will have a central masonry heater as our heat source and most of the house is vaulted so no attic. My concern is that there will a lot of stagnant air at the peaks of the ceiling if no vents are put in. Yet I can only find attic vents such as solar or rotary turbine.

Will these types let out too much air or look ugly from the interior? Are there any good low tech venting options for cathedral ceilings?
 
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Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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You will be losing the warmest air heating the vaulted space to begin with.  Air stagnates when there is no airflow.  There is always some, of course, due to the heat rising and the cooler air descending.  Stagnant air is refreshed by air incoming to your woodstove, which uses Oxygen in it's combustion.  Since fresh air is coming into your home, somehow, in order to feed fresh Oxygen to the fire, I would suggest opening a window a crack somewhere that you don't mind it cooler.  In the case of my place, my bedroom window is open a crack, since I like my sleeping area cool.  This way you are not venting the warmest air from the house, gain the oxygen you need, and get a more optimum temp for sleep.    
 
Kris Arbanas
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For sure Roberto, the hot air will always rise and I can't stop that other than putting a ceiling fan in but my home isn't designed around heating air but rather heating mass. I have a masonry heater with huge thermal mass, thick thermal floor and log walls. I think it will be comfortable even with a lower air temperature on the floor level. I just want a way to exhaust warm, potentially moist air from the peaks.
 
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