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What and What Not in A Compost Bin  RSS feed

 
Norbert Jones
Posts: 1
Location: Ontario
books trees urban
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Composting is a good way to support our soil and Earth, if done in a proper manner. Sometimes, people use materials that aren’t supposed to be in a compost bin, rather in a waste container.
Tea and Coffee bags: Bagless tea leaves and coffee grounds are good, but make sure to remove the bags or containers.
Pet Waste: Pet waste can be composed, but has to be in a separate container. Carnivores often contain parasites in their poop which we wouldn’t want to introduce to the soil which we are growing anything that we will eat. Separate composters are available for these.
Onions and Citrus peels: They contain natural acids and chemicals which kills microorganisms making the decomposition slow.
Meat and Fish Scraps: Even though they decompose well, they attract raccoons, rats and even neighbourhood cats. Living near woods would attract even foxes and bear and coyotes who will definitely destroy the composite bins.
Stickers on veggies and fruits: The stickers and price tags on fruits and vegetables are not biodegradable. These PLU stickers will contaminate the compost pile.
Thanks to the Gorillabins.ca blog entry Never Put These Things Into A Compost Bin for these ideas.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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This list sounds like it was composed for non-composters or beginning composters.

Tea and coffee, the bags, just need to check to make sure the tea you buy comes in biodegradable bags (not lipton, tetly, or other "standard" brands)
All my tea that is in bags comes from China and the bags are rice paper, fully compostable.

Pet waste should be considered Humanure and that means a very hot composting, which will kill any parasites and pathogens.

Onions and Citrus peels should be composted separately again in a hot compost or they can be charred and that can be added to a regular hot compost heap.

Meat and Fish, if your compost heap is heating as it should, just put them in the center and cover, no critters will dig in that.  I regularly compost dead farm animals and have never had any "critter" dig in my heaps.
Stickers and other plasticized items will find their way into the heap, once again if you are building really good, hot compost heaps, these will break down or you can screen your finished compost prior to using and take out anything that isn't compost.



Redhawk
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I have been feeding almost everything to the chooks,but bones,egg shells,advocodo skin and pits,all go into the biochar bin.
I've been wondering what to do about cherry,peach,and nectarine pits.
I don't want my girls to get a croup full of cherry pits and die,how ever unlikely  is.
I think that poison in these pits will be destroyed during the process if creating biochar, but I'm not sure.
What do y'all think?
 
Bryant RedHawk
garden master
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
224
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hau William, why not feed the egg shells to the chooks? that is great source of calcium for them (we wash the shells out and just toss them into the pen, the chooks gobble them up).

Avocado skins will do good things for a compost heap, all pits will make great biochar, just make sure they are fully carbonized and you will have no worries.

Bones are really good to clean, cook and grind into bone meal it is a better use than turning them into biochar.

Redhawk
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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William Bronson wrote:
I've been wondering what to do about cherry,peach,and nectarine pits.


I've taken a load of them out of the stones and they are busy stratifying in my fridge right now while I get three raised beds under tarps so that the weeds grow themselves out and rot down by the time the seeds are ready to plant.  Waste not, want not and all that.  And I still have a lot of bare ground to get fruit trees into...
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1416
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I'd been warned that feeding shells to the chooks could encourage egg eating,but perhaps not.
Avocado bits never seem to break down in my compost,which is haphazard and never really gets hot.
I was trying to avoid the labor of making bone meal.
I was under the impression that the P and K would remain in the char. My soils seem to have plenty of N,so its the other two I was seeking.

I can't seem to keep a sourdough or keifer culture alive,so I've been leery of seed starting that requires stratification,scarifacation, or anything more complicated than sun and water.
'Sids, I'm running out of space for trees,and time for more projects.

So pits to the char chamber for now.
Shells to the chooks,bones,I don't know...
 
Su Ba
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Like Bryant, I compost just about everything. I've even composted adult dead sheep and helped a friend set up an arrangement to compost his dead horse. No problems. The only thing I use to exclude were trimmings from Mexican elderberry. But I discovered that if I chop them up with a lawnmower first, then they can go into the compost bins without resproutung.

The only thing I keep a separate system for is dog, cat, pig, and human manure. I could run these through a hot composting system, but presently I use these in creating the underlay for the orchard trees. When I run out of trees to be planted, then I'll develop a hot, time oriented composting system for them, that is. Repetitive hot composting over a series of months to eliminate pathogens. As I create my orchards, I am mindful of how water moves through my soil and property. I take care to not contaminate things via water movement.
 
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