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raised limecrete platform  RSS feed

 
angela neilson
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Hello I am wanting to build a raised platform for a tent (about 4 square meter). I will use small diameter round poles for the flooring as where I live getting milled timber here is a huge task. I also realize I have to take into consideration the posts to hold up the floor (which I will probably put on stone plinths rather than in the ground as the wood here doesn't do too well in the ground)  for the flex  (how many and how far apart should I place the posts). reason for considering this is the point of my topic, as the floor of the tent platform will be small diameter round poles I wanted to put a layer of limecrete to fashion a flat surface, will this last as a surface or will it wash away when the platform is not in use? even if I incorporated a slight slope for water runoff? and what thickness should it be so as not to crack with hot and cold temps? There is no frost here but we do get a bit of rain and have a mild winter. I have used a cob and concrete mix to encase my fire bath which is in the rain and wet, it holds up well in the weather I may even have to consider this as an option but I wanted more info for the limecrete. (Probably I had better cover it when not in use)

thanks in advance for your help on this wee task.
 
John C Daley
Posts: 44
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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Limecrete is a great product, but its hard to get. In Australia only a few companies mix it.
Concrete is much more readily available.
Limecrete has a few advantages, but here its biggest one is that it does not reflect as much heat in the summer, something we have issues with here.
For what you are doing, unless there is cold snow around a 100mm slab with reinforcing mesh in it would suffice.
I use a lot with fibre into, because mesh can be difficult to cart and lay, whereas fibre is within the mix and costs a bit less than roe.
 
angela neilson
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Hi and thanks for your input.
I was hoping for a bit more information and some more answers to my question /s.

I really enjoy permies.com its a wonderful resource
 
John C Daley
Posts: 44
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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I thought I had given you a start, but limecrete will not wash away with rain, its left exposed to the elements here.
What is the size, you are not clear 2x2 + 4square metres, whilst 4 x 4 is much bigger.
With the system I have described you would not lay any poles on the ground, simply lay some plastic to stop moisture coming up, and lay the lime create within the boxing you will need.
A slight slope to prevent water running through the tent would be a good idea.
 
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