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Choosing local species variants of recommended permaculture plants

 
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In another thread ( http://www.permies.com/permaculture-forums/690_0/permaculture/poplar-trees ), you listed some shrubs, that were more compatible than lawn for my poplar trees, by species.
This got me wondering, does your book cover plants that are local to particular regions?

I live near Cape Cod in Massachusetts and one strange thing that happens on the cape is for people to visit, fall in love with the area, move there, and then immediately start replacing the natural plant life (par of what they fell in love with) with the things that are native to their hometowns.  Lawns are actually an un-natural phenomenon here.  I know this is a big issue in Arizona as well.  Obviously the book would need to be very thick to get into specific species for every area but are there any guidelines or generalizations for people to use when looking up local substitutes for plant types that you recommend?
 
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In the book I don't go into specific recommendations for particular regions, but stick more with species that I know will work in a wide variety of places. The guideline for plant choice in permaculture is to use a species that is native to your area if it can at all do the job you're looking for; then, choose a proven exotic known not to be invasive. Native plant books and societies exist for every part of the US, and that's where to start. A great resource for the NE US is David Jacke's Edible Forest Gardens. Actually, its outstanding for anywhere, but Dave is from New Hampshire and the book has a New England slant in species choices.
 
Ben Souther
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Thanks Toby.
Now I have two books on my wish list.
 
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