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Queens probably for sale (Lowell, Ma, USA) possibly nucs

 
Posts: 43
Location: Lowell, Massachusetts, USA
forest garden bee
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I read that I could advertise. I'm new to beekeeping. I have 5 big hives with my local queens. I made my first queens this year with local survivor genetics. I would like to make large batches of queens next year. It's a hobby. I will decide if I'm selling in November based on hive strength. I probably won't ship. I have connections with larvae and drone donors (beekeepers with Vermont queens, etc.).

When I make queens, I try to get these qualities:
Local treatment free survivors
Minimal southern genetics
Well fed
Hardiness

My bees are...
In all medium boxes
Foundationless
Treatment free

My apiary will be Apocalypse Apiary.
treatment-free-beekeeper-holding-frame-of-brood.jpg
Treatment free beekeeping
 
David Smolinski
Posts: 43
Location: Lowell, Massachusetts, USA
forest garden bee
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I'm also curious about the local bumblebee market.
 
David Smolinski
Posts: 43
Location: Lowell, Massachusetts, USA
forest garden bee
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Just so everyone knows, I definite a treatment free survivors as a colony OR queens made from a colony that survived at least 1 spring, summer, and winter with no foundation or treatments. I collect swarms and use other people's colonies for grafting and mating. This maximizes diversity. I just make sure that the other hives are good survivors.
 
Posts: 83
Location: Mad City, Wisconsin
trees food preservation bee
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David Smolinski wrote:Just so everyone knows, I definite a treatment free survivors as a colony OR queens made from a colony that survived at least 1 spring, summer, and winter with no foundation or treatments. I collect swarms and use other people's colonies for grafting and mating. This maximizes diversity. I just make sure that the other hives are good survivors.



OK, my previous comment become a purple mooseage. It is fine.

While being a fan and practitioner of TF beekeeping, I want to clarify a very important point.

Treatment-free bees are not equal to mite-resistant bees by default.
Most of treatment-free bees will die given enough time (must give them another 3-4 years to self-weed at the very least).

This important point must be very clear.
Otherwise, many potential buyers will assume they are buying mite resistant bees.
Then it will become a disservice to everyone.
All I am saying.

 
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