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New to permaculture

 
                          
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Hello,

Need plenty of advice at the moment have aquired 30 acres 20 cleared and 10 forested.
Most of the land was a sheep and goat farm previously at the moment I have 9 hens 1 rooster free ranging and also 2 pigs which are clearing a patch for where i plan to start a vegitable garden. My first question would be after the pigs (weeners) have cleared that patch about 2 weeks from my calculations how long until I could start my raised beds? incase of disease etc.
My 2nd question is what and how to plant coming from Autum to winter?
Any other advise on how to best use my property would be apreciated
 
              
Posts: 52
Location: Australia
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One small start.

Do not remove any more trees.

Keeping a third of the property in tree cover, especially deciduous trees is important for leaf fall and continual carbon and nutrient cycling on the property.

If you are not on flat land, keep the tees on the higher land areas of the property. The nutrient cycling willl now be powered through natural water movements in the soil from high points to low points spreading nutrients across the lower land where you will concentrate on pastures and cropping activities. For this reason also feed your livestock at the high points as well to concentrate manures on the areas which through natural rainfall will eventually move through the soils from high to low areas of your property.

For your garden beds. If you are in a wet area where water drainage is a problem build raised beds on contour and keep the regular ground as the pathways in between the beds for where you walk. Never walk or compact directly the beds as aeration is extremely important to the organisms that live in your soil.

If you are in a dry area where water evaporates rapidly build the beds down in the ground on contour (lots of digging for you to do) and keep the normal ground for (or build raised) walkways in between where you walk. Never walk or compact directly the beds as aeration is extremely important to the organisms that live in your soil.

If growing veggies to eat, encourage and build bacterial inoculations for the soil.

If growing woody plants and trees, encourage and build aerobic inoculations for the soil (compost teas).


Thats a good start, now just the other 99.999999% of Permaculture to learn


Cheers,
PeterD
 
                          
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Sorry for the late reply thanks for all the advice im having to save it now for for later thoughts.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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As far as  know, properly raised pigs shouldn't be a disease vector.
In-depth soil testing is a valuable tool. If you haven't already, I recommend getting one where you plan a garden/orchard.
I wish I'd had Peter's advice on appropriate garden design  for your climate when I built raised beds! Over here, the default  'raised beds' setting creates irrigation nightmares for many living on the coast (and in NZ, that means nearly everyone).
Should I assume you're in WA? Location would be handy.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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I would read about food forest gardens before I plant any permanent plants using either Gaia's garden or Sepp Holtzer's new permaculture book..(i prefer Gaia's Garden)..it will be a big help on helping you to envision how to use your land..

take the week to read it before you blunder in and have to pull a bunch of stuff out
 
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