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Cook's Pine

 
Posts: 489
Location: Dawson Creek, BC, Canada
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I know of no reason outside of education, as to why anyone would want to grow Cook's pine (from New Caledonia?).  But the idea of growing a tree that does not grow straight up seems useful to me.  Nominally this is a tropical pine, people near the equator could probably grow it in lots of places.  But, for me living at 56N, I really wonder if I could get one to survive here.  I think I would need to find seed from someplace that gets about as cold as we can get.

It would seem that it is quite difficult to find seeds from the home of this pine.  Is there some other plant that could also demonstrate this tendency to grow towards the equator?

 
Posts: 271
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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I don't know about Cook's Pine, but the related Norfolk Pine is only hardy to zone 10, or maybe one or two zones colder if thoroughly sheltered. But they do well as indoor plants, tho they need lots of sun. No idea how they respond to being pruned. Pretty trees, tho.

According to a discussion here
https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/61034/
Cook's Pine tolerate light freezing (zone 9b) so not much tougher.

 
Gordon Haverland
Posts: 489
Location: Dawson Creek, BC, Canada
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I think I ran across something about pines in Hawaii (?) being called Cook's pine, but were actually Norfolk pine?

What makes the Cook pine interesting, is that its growth is tiled to the equator.  I guess in its home territory, it is close enough to the equator, that this wasn't thought to be remarkable.  But I've seen newspaper photos of Cook's pine at places like 30 or 40 degrees S or N latitude, and it is a very strange sight.  Tree growing on the diagonal.  And they were fairly big trees, maybe 40 feet tall (or rather, 40 feet of trunk).

 
Rez Zircon
Posts: 271
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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Yeah, that's a pretty weird trait. Particularly sensitive to coriolis force, maybe?
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